Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Volunteer Work and Psychological Health Following Traumatic Brain Injury

Volunteer Work and Psychological Health Following Traumatic Brain Injury J Head Trauma Rehabil Vol. 24, No. 4, pp. 262–271 Copyright  c 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Focus on Clinical Research and Practice Bruce Caplan, PhD, ABPP (Senior Editor); Jennifer Bogner, PhD (Associate Editor) Volunteer Work and Psychological Health Following Traumatic Brain Injury Marie-Christine Ouellet, PhD ; Charles M. Morin, PhD ; Andre ´ Lavoie, PhD Objectives: To compare the long-term psychological functioning of 3 groups of survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI): (1) those who report being regularly active either by working or studying, (2) those who are not competi- tively employed but are active volunteers, and (3) those who report neither working, studying, nor volunteering. Participants and Procedure: Two hundred eight participants aged 16 years and older with minor to severe TBI were classified as (1) Working/Studying (N = 78), (2) Volunteering (N = 54), or (3) Nonactive (N = 76). Main Outcome Measures: Measures of psychological distress (anxiety, depression, cognitive disturbance, irritability/anger), fatigue, sleep disturbance, and perception of pain. Results: Survivors of TBI who report being active through work, stud- ies, or volunteering demonstrate a significantly higher level of psychological adjustment than persons who report no activity. Even among participants who http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation Wolters Kluwer Health

Volunteer Work and Psychological Health Following Traumatic Brain Injury

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wolters-kluwer-health/volunteer-work-and-psychological-health-following-traumatic-brain-dvNgVlIZf4

References (41)

Copyright
©2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
ISSN
0885-9701
eISSN
1550-509X
DOI
10.1097/HTR.0b013e3181a68b73
pmid
19625865
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J Head Trauma Rehabil Vol. 24, No. 4, pp. 262–271 Copyright  c 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Focus on Clinical Research and Practice Bruce Caplan, PhD, ABPP (Senior Editor); Jennifer Bogner, PhD (Associate Editor) Volunteer Work and Psychological Health Following Traumatic Brain Injury Marie-Christine Ouellet, PhD ; Charles M. Morin, PhD ; Andre ´ Lavoie, PhD Objectives: To compare the long-term psychological functioning of 3 groups of survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI): (1) those who report being regularly active either by working or studying, (2) those who are not competi- tively employed but are active volunteers, and (3) those who report neither working, studying, nor volunteering. Participants and Procedure: Two hundred eight participants aged 16 years and older with minor to severe TBI were classified as (1) Working/Studying (N = 78), (2) Volunteering (N = 54), or (3) Nonactive (N = 76). Main Outcome Measures: Measures of psychological distress (anxiety, depression, cognitive disturbance, irritability/anger), fatigue, sleep disturbance, and perception of pain. Results: Survivors of TBI who report being active through work, stud- ies, or volunteering demonstrate a significantly higher level of psychological adjustment than persons who report no activity. Even among participants who

Journal

Journal of Head Trauma RehabilitationWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jul 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.