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The Problem of Childhood Blindness

The Problem of Childhood Blindness Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/apjoo by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVA5KvPVPZ0P5BEgU+IUTEfzO/GUWifn2IfwcEVVH9SSn on 06/02/2020 EDITORIAL Leah A. Owen, MD, PhD, Julia Byrd, MD, and Geoffrey Tabin, MD n their publication entitled “Causes of Severe Visual Impairment and Blindness: Comparative Data I From Bhutanese and Laotian Schools for the Blind,” Farmer et al seek to determine the major causes of childhood blindness and severe visual impairment in Bhutan and Laos. They examined a total of 53 children, 30 from Bhutan and 23 from Laos. Children were identified for enrollment through par- ticipation in schools for the blind and met inclusion criteria if younger than age 16 with visual impair- ment or blindness per the World Health Organization (WHO) definitions. The authors categorized pathology anatomically and etiologically per WHO guidelines so that it would be directly comparable with other such data sets. They demonstrate a predominance of lens-related pathology (25%) in the Bhutanese cohort as op- posed to whole globe pathology (30.4%) in Laos with hereditary factors representing the most common etiology in both populations. Importantly, the authors highlight avoidable causes of blindness in each population. As depicted in Table 5, Bhutanese students demonstrated a 34.5% rate of avoidable vision loss with causes that include cataracts, amblyopia, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Asia-Pacific Journal of Ophthalmology Wolters Kluwer Health

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN
2162-0989
eISSN
2475-5028
DOI
10.1097/APO.0000000000000158
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/apjoo by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVA5KvPVPZ0P5BEgU+IUTEfzO/GUWifn2IfwcEVVH9SSn on 06/02/2020 EDITORIAL Leah A. Owen, MD, PhD, Julia Byrd, MD, and Geoffrey Tabin, MD n their publication entitled “Causes of Severe Visual Impairment and Blindness: Comparative Data I From Bhutanese and Laotian Schools for the Blind,” Farmer et al seek to determine the major causes of childhood blindness and severe visual impairment in Bhutan and Laos. They examined a total of 53 children, 30 from Bhutan and 23 from Laos. Children were identified for enrollment through par- ticipation in schools for the blind and met inclusion criteria if younger than age 16 with visual impair- ment or blindness per the World Health Organization (WHO) definitions. The authors categorized pathology anatomically and etiologically per WHO guidelines so that it would be directly comparable with other such data sets. They demonstrate a predominance of lens-related pathology (25%) in the Bhutanese cohort as op- posed to whole globe pathology (30.4%) in Laos with hereditary factors representing the most common etiology in both populations. Importantly, the authors highlight avoidable causes of blindness in each population. As depicted in Table 5, Bhutanese students demonstrated a 34.5% rate of avoidable vision loss with causes that include cataracts, amblyopia, and

Journal

The Asia-Pacific Journal of OphthalmologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Dec 1, 2015

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