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The HOPE Pilot Study: Harnessing Patient-Reported Outcomes and Biometric Data to Enhance Cancer Care

The HOPE Pilot Study: Harnessing Patient-Reported Outcomes and Biometric Data to Enhance Cancer Care Purpose: Integrating patient-reported outcomes (PROs) into clinical practice is an increasingly promising strategy for improving patients' symptoms, communication, and clinical outcomes. The objective of the current study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and perceived effectiveness of a mobile health intervention that was designed to collect PROs and activity data as a measure of health status. Patients and Methods: This work was a pilot intervention with 10 patients with gynecologic cancers who received palliative chemotherapy. The HOPE (Helping Our Patients Excel) study used wearable accelerometers to assess physical activity and the Beiwe research platform to collect PROs, stratify patient responses by risk, provide tailored symptom management, and notify patients and clinicians of high-risk symptoms. Feasibility and acceptability were assessed through enrollment and adherence rates, and perceived effectiveness was evaluated by patients and oncologists at study completion. Results: The approach-to-consent rate was 100%, and participants were 90% and 70% adherent to the wearable accelerometers and smartphone surveys, respectively. Participants' mean daily step count was 3,973 (standard deviation [SD], 2,305 steps) and increased from week 1 (mean, 3,520 steps; SD, 1,937 steps) to week 3 (mean, 4,136 steps; SD, 1,578 steps). Active monitoring of participants' heart rates, daily steps, and PROs throughout the study identified anomalies in participants' behavior patterns that suggested poor health for two patients (20%). Patients and clinicians indicated that the intervention improved physical activity, communication, and symptom management. Conclusion: A mobile health intervention that collects PROs and activity data as a measure of health status is feasible, acceptable, and was perceived to be effective in improving symptom management in patients with advanced gynecologic cancers. A larger, multisite, randomized clinical trial to assess the efficacy of the HOPE intervention on patients' symptoms, health-related quality of life, clinical outcomes, and health care use is warranted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JCO Clinical Cancer Informatics Wolters Kluwer Health

The HOPE Pilot Study: Harnessing Patient-Reported Outcomes and Biometric Data to Enhance Cancer Care

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
(C) 2018 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
ISSN
2473-4276
DOI
10.1200/CCI.17.00149
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose: Integrating patient-reported outcomes (PROs) into clinical practice is an increasingly promising strategy for improving patients' symptoms, communication, and clinical outcomes. The objective of the current study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and perceived effectiveness of a mobile health intervention that was designed to collect PROs and activity data as a measure of health status. Patients and Methods: This work was a pilot intervention with 10 patients with gynecologic cancers who received palliative chemotherapy. The HOPE (Helping Our Patients Excel) study used wearable accelerometers to assess physical activity and the Beiwe research platform to collect PROs, stratify patient responses by risk, provide tailored symptom management, and notify patients and clinicians of high-risk symptoms. Feasibility and acceptability were assessed through enrollment and adherence rates, and perceived effectiveness was evaluated by patients and oncologists at study completion. Results: The approach-to-consent rate was 100%, and participants were 90% and 70% adherent to the wearable accelerometers and smartphone surveys, respectively. Participants' mean daily step count was 3,973 (standard deviation [SD], 2,305 steps) and increased from week 1 (mean, 3,520 steps; SD, 1,937 steps) to week 3 (mean, 4,136 steps; SD, 1,578 steps). Active monitoring of participants' heart rates, daily steps, and PROs throughout the study identified anomalies in participants' behavior patterns that suggested poor health for two patients (20%). Patients and clinicians indicated that the intervention improved physical activity, communication, and symptom management. Conclusion: A mobile health intervention that collects PROs and activity data as a measure of health status is feasible, acceptable, and was perceived to be effective in improving symptom management in patients with advanced gynecologic cancers. A larger, multisite, randomized clinical trial to assess the efficacy of the HOPE intervention on patients' symptoms, health-related quality of life, clinical outcomes, and health care use is warranted.

Journal

JCO Clinical Cancer InformaticsWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jun 29, 2018

Keywords: EGR3, RNF130, CHL1, DAPK3, NAA50, ANP32B

References