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The Effect of a Nurse Initiated Therapeutic Conversation Compared to Standard Care for Patients With Acute Pain in the ED

The Effect of a Nurse Initiated Therapeutic Conversation Compared to Standard Care for Patients... Acute pain is a common presenting complaint in the emergency department (ED) and is most often treated with opioid or nonopioid analgesia. However, studies have shown that receiving analgesia alone does not always influence patient satisfaction with pain management in the ED. Pain anxiety and catastrophizing have been shown to affect pain intensity and patients' response to analgesia. The objective of this study was to determine whether a brief therapeutic conversation would improve patient satisfaction with pain management compared with standard care for adult patients presenting to the ED with moderate to severe acute pain. Adult (18 years or older) patients presenting to the ED with moderate to severe acute pain were randomized to either the standard care group or the intervention group. Patients in the intervention group participated in a brief therapeutic conversation with an ED nurse to discuss their perceived cause of pain, level of anxiety, and expectations of their pain management. Prior to discharge, all patients were asked to complete a self-reported, 9-item questionnaire to assess their level of satisfaction with their overall ED experience. A total of 166 patients (83 in each group) were enrolled. Patient satisfaction with ED pain management and the proportion of patients who received analgesia in the ED were similar in both the control (n = 57; 68.7%) and intervention (n = 58; 69.9%) groups (Δ 1.2%; 95% CI [12.6, 15]). Qualitative findings demonstrate that patients place high importance on acknowledgment from ED staff and worry about the unknown cause of pain. This study suggests that patient satisfaction with pain management in the ED is multifactorial and complex. Further research should investigate additional methods of integrating nurse-led interventions into the care of patients in acute pain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal Wolters Kluwer Health

The Effect of a Nurse Initiated Therapeutic Conversation Compared to Standard Care for Patients With Acute Pain in the ED

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
© 2021 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1931-4485
eISSN
1931-4493
DOI
10.1097/tme.0000000000000363
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acute pain is a common presenting complaint in the emergency department (ED) and is most often treated with opioid or nonopioid analgesia. However, studies have shown that receiving analgesia alone does not always influence patient satisfaction with pain management in the ED. Pain anxiety and catastrophizing have been shown to affect pain intensity and patients' response to analgesia. The objective of this study was to determine whether a brief therapeutic conversation would improve patient satisfaction with pain management compared with standard care for adult patients presenting to the ED with moderate to severe acute pain. Adult (18 years or older) patients presenting to the ED with moderate to severe acute pain were randomized to either the standard care group or the intervention group. Patients in the intervention group participated in a brief therapeutic conversation with an ED nurse to discuss their perceived cause of pain, level of anxiety, and expectations of their pain management. Prior to discharge, all patients were asked to complete a self-reported, 9-item questionnaire to assess their level of satisfaction with their overall ED experience. A total of 166 patients (83 in each group) were enrolled. Patient satisfaction with ED pain management and the proportion of patients who received analgesia in the ED were similar in both the control (n = 57; 68.7%) and intervention (n = 58; 69.9%) groups (Δ 1.2%; 95% CI [12.6, 15]). Qualitative findings demonstrate that patients place high importance on acknowledgment from ED staff and worry about the unknown cause of pain. This study suggests that patient satisfaction with pain management in the ED is multifactorial and complex. Further research should investigate additional methods of integrating nurse-led interventions into the care of patients in acute pain.

Journal

Advanced Emergency Nursing JournalWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jul 1, 2021

References