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Role of Built Environments in Physical Activity, Obesity, and Cardiovascular Disease

Role of Built Environments in Physical Activity, Obesity, and Cardiovascular Disease Recent Advances in Preventive Cardiology and Lifestyle Medicine Role of Built Environments in Physical Activity, Obesity, and Cardiovascular Disease James F. Sallis, PhD; Myron F. Floyd, PhD; Daniel A. Rodrı´guez, PhD; Brian E. Saelens, PhD n industrialized nations like the United States and Sweden, ture, and parks and trails. Policies can be laws and regula- the vast majority of adults do not meet the physical activity tions at any level of government, corporate practices, and guidelines of 150 minutes per week. Inactive lifestyles put rules at institutions such as schools. Changing built environ- most adults at risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), diabe- ments and policies is expected to have a long-term impact on tes mellitus, obesity, some cancers, osteoporosis, and psycho- most or all of the people in those places. Characteristics of logical disorders. Physical activity can be effective at all built environments, from neighborhoods to cities, have been 8 –10 phases of chronic disease management, from primordial related to rates of chronic disease and mental health and 11,12 11 prevention (prevention of risk factors) through treatment and risk factors such as obesity and hypertension. Physical rehabilitation. There is particular interest in the potential for activity is believed to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Circulation Wolters Kluwer Health

Role of Built Environments in Physical Activity, Obesity, and Cardiovascular Disease

Circulation , Volume 125 (5) – Feb 1, 2012

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References (86)

Copyright
© 2012 American Heart Association, Inc.
ISSN
0009-7322
eISSN
1524-4539
DOI
10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.969022
pmid
22311885
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent Advances in Preventive Cardiology and Lifestyle Medicine Role of Built Environments in Physical Activity, Obesity, and Cardiovascular Disease James F. Sallis, PhD; Myron F. Floyd, PhD; Daniel A. Rodrı´guez, PhD; Brian E. Saelens, PhD n industrialized nations like the United States and Sweden, ture, and parks and trails. Policies can be laws and regula- the vast majority of adults do not meet the physical activity tions at any level of government, corporate practices, and guidelines of 150 minutes per week. Inactive lifestyles put rules at institutions such as schools. Changing built environ- most adults at risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), diabe- ments and policies is expected to have a long-term impact on tes mellitus, obesity, some cancers, osteoporosis, and psycho- most or all of the people in those places. Characteristics of logical disorders. Physical activity can be effective at all built environments, from neighborhoods to cities, have been 8 –10 phases of chronic disease management, from primordial related to rates of chronic disease and mental health and 11,12 11 prevention (prevention of risk factors) through treatment and risk factors such as obesity and hypertension. Physical rehabilitation. There is particular interest in the potential for activity is believed to

Journal

CirculationWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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