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Risk Factors and Raised Atherosclerotic Lesions in Coronary and Cerebral Arteries

Risk Factors and Raised Atherosclerotic Lesions in Coronary and Cerebral Arteries In 1972–1973, about 16,200 men living In Oslo, aged 40 to 49 years, were examined for cardiovascular disease, and had a number of coronary risk factors measured. This report gives the results of 129 autopsied cases with regard to the association between raised atherosclerotic lesions In coronary and cerebral arteries and various coronary risk factors. For coronary raised lesions, the high density llpoproteln (HDL) cholesterol ratio was the most significant risk factor. Systolic blood pressure and total serum cholesterol were also significantly associated. Physical activity at work and at leisure, nonfastlng trlglycerldes, and cigarette smoking did not show a significant association with coronary artery raised lesions. The association between total serum cholesterol and systolic blood pressure Indicates that total serum cholesterol may be more Important than systolic blood pressure In the synerglsm affecting the development of coronary atherosclerosis. For cerebral artery raised lesions, blood pressure was the most important risk factor, even though serum cholesterol was highly associated with the lesions. The Interaction analysis also suggested that blood pressure was more Important than serum cholesterol In the synerglsm. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arteriosclerosis Wolters Kluwer Health

Risk Factors and Raised Atherosclerotic Lesions in Coronary and Cerebral Arteries

Arteriosclerosis , Volume 1 (4) – Jul 1, 1981

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Copyright
© 1981 by American Heart Association, Inc.
ISSN
0276-5047

Abstract

In 1972–1973, about 16,200 men living In Oslo, aged 40 to 49 years, were examined for cardiovascular disease, and had a number of coronary risk factors measured. This report gives the results of 129 autopsied cases with regard to the association between raised atherosclerotic lesions In coronary and cerebral arteries and various coronary risk factors. For coronary raised lesions, the high density llpoproteln (HDL) cholesterol ratio was the most significant risk factor. Systolic blood pressure and total serum cholesterol were also significantly associated. Physical activity at work and at leisure, nonfastlng trlglycerldes, and cigarette smoking did not show a significant association with coronary artery raised lesions. The association between total serum cholesterol and systolic blood pressure Indicates that total serum cholesterol may be more Important than systolic blood pressure In the synerglsm affecting the development of coronary atherosclerosis. For cerebral artery raised lesions, blood pressure was the most important risk factor, even though serum cholesterol was highly associated with the lesions. The Interaction analysis also suggested that blood pressure was more Important than serum cholesterol In the synerglsm.

Journal

ArteriosclerosisWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jul 1, 1981

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