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Relationship Between Changes in Prehospital Blood Pressure and Early Neurological Deterioration in Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

Relationship Between Changes in Prehospital Blood Pressure and Early Neurological Deterioration... The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between changes in prehospital blood pressure (BP) and the incidence of early neurological deterioration (END) after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) in patients who arrive at the emergency department (ED) with a normal Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. Records of consecutive adults with SICH transported by ambulance and treated in our ED from January 2015 to December 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. The study cohort included all patients with SICH occurring within the previous 6 hr who had a normal GCS score on ED arrival. Detailed information was retrieved from our hospital's intracerebral hemorrhage databank and then cross-checked in the medical and nursing charts to confirm completeness and accuracy. Early neurological deterioration was defined as a decrease of 2 or more points in the GCS score within 6 hr after ED arrival. The change in prehospital BP was defined as the BP on ED arrival minus the initial on-scene BP. An association between a change in prehospital BP and the occurrence of END was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses (multiple logistic regression analysis). Of the 168 patients evaluated, 36 (21.4%) developed END. Factors associated with END on univariate analysis were regular antiplatelet agent use, shorter elapsed time, on-scene systolic blood pressure (SBP), prehospital SBP increase of 15 mmHg or more, intraventricular extension of the hematoma, and the presence of 3 or more noncontrast computed tomographic signs of hematoma expansion. After adjusting for other covariates, an increase in prehospital SBP of 15 mmHg or more was significantly associated with a higher risk of END. In patients with SICH who arrive at the ED with a normal GCS score, an increase in the prehospital SBP of more than 15 mmHg is associated with a higher incidence of END. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal Wolters Kluwer Health

Relationship Between Changes in Prehospital Blood Pressure and Early Neurological Deterioration in Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
© 2019 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1931-4485
eISSN
1931-4493
DOI
10.1097/TME.0000000000000239
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between changes in prehospital blood pressure (BP) and the incidence of early neurological deterioration (END) after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) in patients who arrive at the emergency department (ED) with a normal Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. Records of consecutive adults with SICH transported by ambulance and treated in our ED from January 2015 to December 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. The study cohort included all patients with SICH occurring within the previous 6 hr who had a normal GCS score on ED arrival. Detailed information was retrieved from our hospital's intracerebral hemorrhage databank and then cross-checked in the medical and nursing charts to confirm completeness and accuracy. Early neurological deterioration was defined as a decrease of 2 or more points in the GCS score within 6 hr after ED arrival. The change in prehospital BP was defined as the BP on ED arrival minus the initial on-scene BP. An association between a change in prehospital BP and the occurrence of END was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses (multiple logistic regression analysis). Of the 168 patients evaluated, 36 (21.4%) developed END. Factors associated with END on univariate analysis were regular antiplatelet agent use, shorter elapsed time, on-scene systolic blood pressure (SBP), prehospital SBP increase of 15 mmHg or more, intraventricular extension of the hematoma, and the presence of 3 or more noncontrast computed tomographic signs of hematoma expansion. After adjusting for other covariates, an increase in prehospital SBP of 15 mmHg or more was significantly associated with a higher risk of END. In patients with SICH who arrive at the ED with a normal GCS score, an increase in the prehospital SBP of more than 15 mmHg is associated with a higher incidence of END.

Journal

Advanced Emergency Nursing JournalWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Apr 1, 2019

References