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Psychosocial and Emotional Outcomes 10 Years Following Traumatic Brain Injury

Psychosocial and Emotional Outcomes 10 Years Following Traumatic Brain Injury J Head Trauma Rehabil Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 278–287 Copyright  c 2007 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Psychosocial and Emotional Outcomes 10 Years Following Traumatic Brain Injury Kristy Draper, BA ; Jennie Ponsford, PhD ; Michael Schonber ¨ ger, PhD Objectives: To investigate the association of psychosocial outcome 10 years following traumatic brain injury (TBI) with demographic variables, injury severity, current cognitive functioning, emotional state, aggression, alcohol use, and fatigue. Setting: Community-based follow-up. Participants: Fifty-three participants with mild to very severe TBI sustained 10 years previously and significant others. Measures: Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale, Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, NFI Aggression scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, neuropsychological tests of attention/processing speed, memory, and executive function. Results: Psychosocial functioning was lowest in the occupational activity domain and highest in the living skills domains. Variables including education, posttraumatic amnesia duration, numerous cognitive measures, concurrent fatigue, aggression, anxiety, and depression were all significantly associated with psychoso- cial outcome, although the strength of correlations varied between ratings of participants with TBI and relatives. Posttraumatic amnesia duration was most strongly associated with psychosocial outcome measured by relatives; anxiety, aggression, and depression http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation Wolters Kluwer Health

Psychosocial and Emotional Outcomes 10 Years Following Traumatic Brain Injury

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References (69)

Copyright
© 2007 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN
0885-9701
eISSN
1550-509X
DOI
10.1097/01.HTR.0000290972.63753.a7
pmid
17878769
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J Head Trauma Rehabil Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 278–287 Copyright  c 2007 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Psychosocial and Emotional Outcomes 10 Years Following Traumatic Brain Injury Kristy Draper, BA ; Jennie Ponsford, PhD ; Michael Schonber ¨ ger, PhD Objectives: To investigate the association of psychosocial outcome 10 years following traumatic brain injury (TBI) with demographic variables, injury severity, current cognitive functioning, emotional state, aggression, alcohol use, and fatigue. Setting: Community-based follow-up. Participants: Fifty-three participants with mild to very severe TBI sustained 10 years previously and significant others. Measures: Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale, Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, NFI Aggression scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, neuropsychological tests of attention/processing speed, memory, and executive function. Results: Psychosocial functioning was lowest in the occupational activity domain and highest in the living skills domains. Variables including education, posttraumatic amnesia duration, numerous cognitive measures, concurrent fatigue, aggression, anxiety, and depression were all significantly associated with psychoso- cial outcome, although the strength of correlations varied between ratings of participants with TBI and relatives. Posttraumatic amnesia duration was most strongly associated with psychosocial outcome measured by relatives; anxiety, aggression, and depression

Journal

Journal of Head Trauma RehabilitationWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Sep 1, 2007

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