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Psychiatric Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury Their Nature and Frequency

Psychiatric Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury Their Nature and Frequency J Head Trauma Rehabil Vol. 24, No. 5, pp. 324–332 Copyright  c 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Psychiatric Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Their Nature and Frequency Rochelle Whelan-Goodinson, DPsych ; Jennie Ponsford, PhD ; Lisa Johnston, PhD ; Fiona Grant, PhD Objectives: To retrospectively establish the nature and frequency of Axis I psychiatric disorders pre- and post-TBI. Participants: One hundred participants who were 0.5 to 5.5 years post mild to severe TBI and 87 informants, each evaluated at a single time point. Main Measure: The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID-I). Results: Preinjury, 52% received a psychiatric diagnosis, most commonly substance use disorder (41%), followed by major depressive disorder (17%) and anxiety (13%). Postinjury, 65% received a diagnosis, of which major depression became the most common (45%), followed by anxiety (38%) and substance use disorder (21%). Frequency of depression, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, and phobias rose from preinjury to postinjury. More than two-thirds of postinjury depression and anxiety cases were novel and showed poor resolution rates. Few novel cases of substance use disorder were noted. Psychotic disorders, somatoform disorders, and eating disorders occurred at frequencies similar to those http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation Wolters Kluwer Health

Psychiatric Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury Their Nature and Frequency

Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation , Volume 24 (5) – Sep 1, 2009

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References (48)

Copyright
©2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN
0885-9701
eISSN
1550-509X
DOI
10.1097/HTR.0b013e3181a712aa
pmid
19858966
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J Head Trauma Rehabil Vol. 24, No. 5, pp. 324–332 Copyright  c 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Psychiatric Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Their Nature and Frequency Rochelle Whelan-Goodinson, DPsych ; Jennie Ponsford, PhD ; Lisa Johnston, PhD ; Fiona Grant, PhD Objectives: To retrospectively establish the nature and frequency of Axis I psychiatric disorders pre- and post-TBI. Participants: One hundred participants who were 0.5 to 5.5 years post mild to severe TBI and 87 informants, each evaluated at a single time point. Main Measure: The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID-I). Results: Preinjury, 52% received a psychiatric diagnosis, most commonly substance use disorder (41%), followed by major depressive disorder (17%) and anxiety (13%). Postinjury, 65% received a diagnosis, of which major depression became the most common (45%), followed by anxiety (38%) and substance use disorder (21%). Frequency of depression, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, and phobias rose from preinjury to postinjury. More than two-thirds of postinjury depression and anxiety cases were novel and showed poor resolution rates. Few novel cases of substance use disorder were noted. Psychotic disorders, somatoform disorders, and eating disorders occurred at frequencies similar to those

Journal

Journal of Head Trauma RehabilitationWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Sep 1, 2009

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