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Predictors of Psychiatric Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury

Predictors of Psychiatric Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury LWW/JHTR JHTR-D-09-00011R2 August 27, 2010 20:42 Char Count= 0 J Head Trauma Rehabil Vol. 25, No. 5, pp. 320–329 Copyright  c 2010 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Predictors of Psychiatric Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury Rochelle Whelan-Goodinson, DPsych ; Jennie Louise Ponsford, PhD ; Michael Schonber ¨ ger, PhD ; Lisa Johnston, PhD Objective: To investigate predictors of posttraumatic brain injury psychiatric disorders. Design: Retrospective, cross- sectional design with stratified random sampling of groups of patients on average 1 to 5 years postinjury. DSM-based diagnostic interviews of both traumatic brain injury (TBI) participant and informant. Participants: One hundred community-based participants, aged 19–74 years, with traumatic brain injury sustained 0.05–5.5 years previously. Setting: Community-based patients previously treated at a rehabilitation hospital. Main measure: The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnosis. Results: A psychiatric history was a high-risk factor for having the same disorder postinjury. However, the majority of cases of depression and anxiety were novel, suggesting that significant factors other than pre-TBI psychiatric status contribute to post-TBI psychiatric outcome. Female gender, lower education, and pain were also associated with postinjury depression and unemployment and older age with anxiety. Conclusion: Findings suggest that long-term screening and support http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation Wolters Kluwer Health

Predictors of Psychiatric Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury

Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation , Volume 25 (5) – Sep 1, 2010

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Copyright
© 2010 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN
0885-9701
eISSN
1550-509X
DOI
10.1097/HTR.0b013e3181c8f8e7
pmid
20042983
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LWW/JHTR JHTR-D-09-00011R2 August 27, 2010 20:42 Char Count= 0 J Head Trauma Rehabil Vol. 25, No. 5, pp. 320–329 Copyright  c 2010 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Predictors of Psychiatric Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury Rochelle Whelan-Goodinson, DPsych ; Jennie Louise Ponsford, PhD ; Michael Schonber ¨ ger, PhD ; Lisa Johnston, PhD Objective: To investigate predictors of posttraumatic brain injury psychiatric disorders. Design: Retrospective, cross- sectional design with stratified random sampling of groups of patients on average 1 to 5 years postinjury. DSM-based diagnostic interviews of both traumatic brain injury (TBI) participant and informant. Participants: One hundred community-based participants, aged 19–74 years, with traumatic brain injury sustained 0.05–5.5 years previously. Setting: Community-based patients previously treated at a rehabilitation hospital. Main measure: The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnosis. Results: A psychiatric history was a high-risk factor for having the same disorder postinjury. However, the majority of cases of depression and anxiety were novel, suggesting that significant factors other than pre-TBI psychiatric status contribute to post-TBI psychiatric outcome. Female gender, lower education, and pain were also associated with postinjury depression and unemployment and older age with anxiety. Conclusion: Findings suggest that long-term screening and support

Journal

Journal of Head Trauma RehabilitationWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Sep 1, 2010

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