Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Post-traumatic stress disorder in combat veterans

Post-traumatic stress disorder in combat veterans Downloaded from https://pdfs.journals.lww.com/jaapa by BhDMf5ePHKZxZb3ruX4b9cKfbT5h3bp+v9gTtSlrchDWvVTxyN8Hif2P/rPZfAxb8td684/2m6Qj/1S0ZObgiiKJ9vD64yNdY1wI1G/v4gN3ti1fujtTJsg5898WZFuC on 02/23/2019 COMMENTARY Kim J. Masters, MD, FACP, DFAPA, DFAACAP he article on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) crisis raised by confl icts such as killing a child to protect in combat veterans in this issue (page 21) is a oneself and one’s comrades. • Tertiary prevention to prevent PTSD symptoms from Tcritical addition to clinicians’ armamentarium in distressing others in the affected person’s family and com- the assessment, treatment, and management of PTSD munity. Family members of veterans diagnosed with PTSD in combat-exposed veterans. The article highlights the respond to how information about the trauma is shared, extent of PTSD, the evidence-based treatments, and the which in turn affects economic and social well-being and unique position of physician assistants (PAs) to engage relationships with family, friends, neighbors, and other with military patients. Thirty percent of PAs have some members of the community. PTSD symptoms can be com- military experience, and in 2010 almost 2,010 PAs were pounded by survivor guilt and comorbid traumatic brain employed in the VA hospital system. injury and combat-related physical injuries. PAs, especially The article also is an invitation to engage PAs in PTSD those in primary care or at Veterans Affairs facilities, are assessments and treatment. In the role of fi rst contact with well positioned to understand the role of the family in PTSD many patients and their families, PAs can form treatment treatments and to be aware of cultural and community alliances and work for effective treatments. One approach 5,6 issues and resources. is to engage patients and their support systems in public In every sense, this article is a clarion call for PA involve- health prevention measures. ment in PTSD treatments, not only those of combat vet- • Primary prevention efforts or preventing PTSD. Adverse erans, but those in the community who come to primary childhood events, particularly childhood sexual abuse, care and psychiatric clinics with the wounds from violence, domestic violence, bullying, and homelessness, are well assault, sexual abuse, school bullying, and homelessness. known as causes of adverse consequences during life, 1,2 By all means, get involved either through your own prac- including an increase in suicide and a shortened life span. tice, through discussions with colleagues, with grand round Primary care providers who screen patients for adverse presentations, at national PA meetings, through speaking childhood events can devise effective treatment strategies in public forums, or through writing articles for your local and reduce patients’ risk for PTSD. community, in public media, and in professional journals. PAs also can work with the military and civilian networks In summary, PAs are well positioned to provide leader- to support strategies and programs to reduce the high rate ship on PTSD awareness, diagnosis, and treatment. It of sexual harassment and assault of women in the military ensures continual challenges in caring for patients because (affecting 31% of women in the military in one study). new instances are an hourly occurrence, and their traumatic • Secondary prevention efforts to mitigate PTSD symptom- effects potentially lifelong. atology in patients who are diagnosed. This issue’s article JAAPA presents many treatment options. Additional treatments REFERENCES could include dealing with moral injury issues, which occur 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Adverse childhood when a person’s core beliefs are contravened by his or her experiences. www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/index. actions. Several new treatment protocols target the moral html. Accessed August 8, 2018. 2. National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. Adverse childhood experience questionnaire. www.ncjfcj.org/sites/default/ Kim J. Masters is an adjunct assistant professor fi les/Finding%20Your%20ACE%20Score.pdf. Accessed August in the Department of Psychiatry and Department 8, 2018. of Physician Assistant Studies at Wake Forest 3. Lofgreen AM, Carroll KK, Dugan SA, Karnik NS. An overview University in Winston-Salem, N.C., an affi liate of sexual trauma in the US military. Focus. 2017;15:411-419. assistant professor in the PA program at the 4. Held P, Klassen BJ, Zalta AK, Pollack MH. Understanding the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, impact and treatment of moral injury among military service a professor in the PA program at A.T. Still University members. Focus. 2017;15:399-405. in Mesa, Ariz., and a consultant for Three Rivers Midlands Campus 5. Lester P, Rauch P, Loucks L, Sornborger J, Ohye B. Posttrau- matic stress disorder and military-connected families: the rel- Residential Treatment Center in West Columbia, S.C. The author has evance of a family centered approach. Focus. 2017;15:420-428. disclosed no potential confl icts of interest, fi nancial or otherwise. 6. Brofenbrenner’s bioecologic model of development. www. DOI:10.1097/01.JAA.0000546487.96721.81 learning-theories.com/bronfenbrenners-bioecological-model- bronfenbrenner.htm. Accessed August 8, 2018. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Physician Assistants JAAPA Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants www.JAAPA.com 11 Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Physician Assistants Downloaded from https://pdfs.journals.lww.com/jaapa by BhDMf5ePHKZxZb3ruX4b9cKfbT5h3bp+v9gTtSlrchDWvVTxyN8Hif2P/rPZfAxb8td684/2m6Qj/1S0ZObgiiKJ9vD64yNdY1wI1G/v4gN3ti1fujtTJsg5898WZFuC on 02/23/2019 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of PAs Wolters Kluwer Health

Post-traumatic stress disorder in combat veterans

Journal of the American Academy of PAs , Volume 31 (11) – Nov 1, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wolters-kluwer-health/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-in-combat-veterans-0Ge9sd1a3B
Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN
1547-1896
eISSN
0893-7400
DOI
10.1097/01.JAA.0000546487.96721.81
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from https://pdfs.journals.lww.com/jaapa by BhDMf5ePHKZxZb3ruX4b9cKfbT5h3bp+v9gTtSlrchDWvVTxyN8Hif2P/rPZfAxb8td684/2m6Qj/1S0ZObgiiKJ9vD64yNdY1wI1G/v4gN3ti1fujtTJsg5898WZFuC on 02/23/2019 COMMENTARY Kim J. Masters, MD, FACP, DFAPA, DFAACAP he article on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) crisis raised by confl icts such as killing a child to protect in combat veterans in this issue (page 21) is a oneself and one’s comrades. • Tertiary prevention to prevent PTSD symptoms from Tcritical addition to clinicians’ armamentarium in distressing others in the affected person’s family and com- the assessment, treatment, and management of PTSD munity. Family members of veterans diagnosed with PTSD in combat-exposed veterans. The article highlights the respond to how information about the trauma is shared, extent of PTSD, the evidence-based treatments, and the which in turn affects economic and social well-being and unique position of physician assistants (PAs) to engage relationships with family, friends, neighbors, and other with military patients. Thirty percent of PAs have some members of the community. PTSD symptoms can be com- military experience, and in 2010 almost 2,010 PAs were pounded by survivor guilt and comorbid traumatic brain employed in the VA hospital system. injury and combat-related physical injuries. PAs, especially The article also is an invitation to engage PAs in PTSD those in primary care or at Veterans Affairs facilities, are assessments and treatment. In the role of fi rst contact with well positioned to understand the role of the family in PTSD many patients and their families, PAs can form treatment treatments and to be aware of cultural and community alliances and work for effective treatments. One approach 5,6 issues and resources. is to engage patients and their support systems in public In every sense, this article is a clarion call for PA involve- health prevention measures. ment in PTSD treatments, not only those of combat vet- • Primary prevention efforts or preventing PTSD. Adverse erans, but those in the community who come to primary childhood events, particularly childhood sexual abuse, care and psychiatric clinics with the wounds from violence, domestic violence, bullying, and homelessness, are well assault, sexual abuse, school bullying, and homelessness. known as causes of adverse consequences during life, 1,2 By all means, get involved either through your own prac- including an increase in suicide and a shortened life span. tice, through discussions with colleagues, with grand round Primary care providers who screen patients for adverse presentations, at national PA meetings, through speaking childhood events can devise effective treatment strategies in public forums, or through writing articles for your local and reduce patients’ risk for PTSD. community, in public media, and in professional journals. PAs also can work with the military and civilian networks In summary, PAs are well positioned to provide leader- to support strategies and programs to reduce the high rate ship on PTSD awareness, diagnosis, and treatment. It of sexual harassment and assault of women in the military ensures continual challenges in caring for patients because (affecting 31% of women in the military in one study). new instances are an hourly occurrence, and their traumatic • Secondary prevention efforts to mitigate PTSD symptom- effects potentially lifelong. atology in patients who are diagnosed. This issue’s article JAAPA presents many treatment options. Additional treatments REFERENCES could include dealing with moral injury issues, which occur 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Adverse childhood when a person’s core beliefs are contravened by his or her experiences. www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/index. actions. Several new treatment protocols target the moral html. Accessed August 8, 2018. 2. National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. Adverse childhood experience questionnaire. www.ncjfcj.org/sites/default/ Kim J. Masters is an adjunct assistant professor fi les/Finding%20Your%20ACE%20Score.pdf. Accessed August in the Department of Psychiatry and Department 8, 2018. of Physician Assistant Studies at Wake Forest 3. Lofgreen AM, Carroll KK, Dugan SA, Karnik NS. An overview University in Winston-Salem, N.C., an affi liate of sexual trauma in the US military. Focus. 2017;15:411-419. assistant professor in the PA program at the 4. Held P, Klassen BJ, Zalta AK, Pollack MH. Understanding the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, impact and treatment of moral injury among military service a professor in the PA program at A.T. Still University members. Focus. 2017;15:399-405. in Mesa, Ariz., and a consultant for Three Rivers Midlands Campus 5. Lester P, Rauch P, Loucks L, Sornborger J, Ohye B. Posttrau- matic stress disorder and military-connected families: the rel- Residential Treatment Center in West Columbia, S.C. The author has evance of a family centered approach. Focus. 2017;15:420-428. disclosed no potential confl icts of interest, fi nancial or otherwise. 6. Brofenbrenner’s bioecologic model of development. www. DOI:10.1097/01.JAA.0000546487.96721.81 learning-theories.com/bronfenbrenners-bioecological-model- bronfenbrenner.htm. Accessed August 8, 2018. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Physician Assistants JAAPA Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants www.JAAPA.com 11 Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Physician Assistants Downloaded from https://pdfs.journals.lww.com/jaapa by BhDMf5ePHKZxZb3ruX4b9cKfbT5h3bp+v9gTtSlrchDWvVTxyN8Hif2P/rPZfAxb8td684/2m6Qj/1S0ZObgiiKJ9vD64yNdY1wI1G/v4gN3ti1fujtTJsg5898WZFuC on 02/23/2019

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of PAsWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Nov 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.