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Physiotherapist Adaptations to Cancer, HIV/AIDS, and Hospice and Palliative Care in the COVID-19 Era: A Global Perspective Paper

Physiotherapist Adaptations to Cancer, HIV/AIDS, and Hospice and Palliative Care in the COVID-19... In the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, physiotherapists (PTs) across the globe were required to rapidly adapt clinical practice to provide safe and effective care for people with HIV/AIDS and cancer and those in hospice and palliative care. These rapid decisions included developing criteria for in-person versus remote care and developing equitable platforms for telehealth and telerehabilitation. Most decisions were made with limited guidelines or evidence for practice related to the pandemic. The purpose of this perspective was to provide a synopsis of the experiences of 25 PTs from 16 countries regarding their clinical decisions for (1) rapid adaptation of patient care delivery, (2) evaluation criteria to treat in-person or remotely, (3) utilization decisions for telerehabilitation, (4) determinations for future practice and research needs, and (5) promotion of health equity in an environment rapidly transformed by a highly infectious and deadly disease. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rehabilitation Oncology Wolters Kluwer Health

Physiotherapist Adaptations to Cancer, HIV/AIDS, and Hospice and Palliative Care in the COVID-19 Era: A Global Perspective Paper

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
© 2020 Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy, APTA.
ISSN
2168-3808
eISSN
2381-2427
DOI
10.1097/01.REO.0000000000000231
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, physiotherapists (PTs) across the globe were required to rapidly adapt clinical practice to provide safe and effective care for people with HIV/AIDS and cancer and those in hospice and palliative care. These rapid decisions included developing criteria for in-person versus remote care and developing equitable platforms for telehealth and telerehabilitation. Most decisions were made with limited guidelines or evidence for practice related to the pandemic. The purpose of this perspective was to provide a synopsis of the experiences of 25 PTs from 16 countries regarding their clinical decisions for (1) rapid adaptation of patient care delivery, (2) evaluation criteria to treat in-person or remotely, (3) utilization decisions for telerehabilitation, (4) determinations for future practice and research needs, and (5) promotion of health equity in an environment rapidly transformed by a highly infectious and deadly disease.

Journal

Rehabilitation OncologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Oct 1, 2020

References