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Neuropsychological Performance Is Associated With Vascular Function in Patients With Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

Neuropsychological Performance Is Associated With Vascular Function in Patients With... Neuropsychological Performance Is Associated With Vascular Function in Patients With Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease David J. Moser, Robert G. Robinson, Stephanie M. Hynes, Rebecca L. Reese, Stephan Arndt, Jane S. Paulsen, William G. Haynes Objective—We previously reported preliminary data (N14) demonstrating a significant and positive relationship between forearm vascular function and neuropsychological performance in individuals with atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD). The current study was conducted to confirm and extend those findings in a much larger, nonoverlapping sample. Methods and Results—Participants were 82 individuals with AVD, with no history of stroke, cardiac surgery, or dementia. Forearm vascular function was measured before and after brachial artery infusion of vasoactive agents (acetylcholine, nitroprusside, verapamil). Neuropsychological functioning was assessed with the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status. Statistical analysis included multiple regression and partial correlations, controlling for education. Vascular function was significantly and positively associated with neuropsychological performance [R change0.116, F change (3,74)3.72, P0.015]. Follow-up analyses indicated that smooth muscle function was the aspect of vascular function most strongly associated with neuropsychological performance. Individual vascular risk factors were not significantly associated with neuropsychological performance when controlling for vascular function. Conclusions—Better vascular function is significantly associated with better neuropsychological performance in individuals with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology Wolters Kluwer Health

Neuropsychological Performance Is Associated With Vascular Function in Patients With Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

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ISSN
1079-5642
eISSN
1524-4636
DOI
10.1161/01.ATV.0000250973.93401.2d
pmid
17068287

Abstract

Neuropsychological Performance Is Associated With Vascular Function in Patients With Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease David J. Moser, Robert G. Robinson, Stephanie M. Hynes, Rebecca L. Reese, Stephan Arndt, Jane S. Paulsen, William G. Haynes Objective—We previously reported preliminary data (N14) demonstrating a significant and positive relationship between forearm vascular function and neuropsychological performance in individuals with atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD). The current study was conducted to confirm and extend those findings in a much larger, nonoverlapping sample. Methods and Results—Participants were 82 individuals with AVD, with no history of stroke, cardiac surgery, or dementia. Forearm vascular function was measured before and after brachial artery infusion of vasoactive agents (acetylcholine, nitroprusside, verapamil). Neuropsychological functioning was assessed with the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status. Statistical analysis included multiple regression and partial correlations, controlling for education. Vascular function was significantly and positively associated with neuropsychological performance [R change0.116, F change (3,74)3.72, P0.015]. Follow-up analyses indicated that smooth muscle function was the aspect of vascular function most strongly associated with neuropsychological performance. Individual vascular risk factors were not significantly associated with neuropsychological performance when controlling for vascular function. Conclusions—Better vascular function is significantly associated with better neuropsychological performance in individuals with

Journal

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular BiologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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