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Lost in knowledge translation: Time for a map?

Lost in knowledge translation: Time for a map? There is confusion and misunderstanding about the concepts of knowledge translation, knowledge transfer, knowledge exchange, research utilization, implementation, diffusion, and dissemination. We review the terms and definitions used to describe the concept of moving knowledge into action. We also offer a conceptual framework for thinking about the process and integrate the roles of knowledge creation and knowledge application. The implications of knowledge translation for continuing education in the health professions include the need to base continuing education on the best available knowledge, the use of educational and other transfer strategies that are known to be effective, and the value of learning about planned‐action theories to be better able to understand and influence change in practice settings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions Wolters Kluwer Health

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0894-1912
eISSN
1554-558X
DOI
10.1002/chp.47
pmid
16557505
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is confusion and misunderstanding about the concepts of knowledge translation, knowledge transfer, knowledge exchange, research utilization, implementation, diffusion, and dissemination. We review the terms and definitions used to describe the concept of moving knowledge into action. We also offer a conceptual framework for thinking about the process and integrate the roles of knowledge creation and knowledge application. The implications of knowledge translation for continuing education in the health professions include the need to base continuing education on the best available knowledge, the use of educational and other transfer strategies that are known to be effective, and the value of learning about planned‐action theories to be better able to understand and influence change in practice settings.

Journal

The Journal of Continuing Education in the Health ProfessionsWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Dec 1, 2006

References