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Lack of Immunohistochemical Detection of VEGF in Prostate Carcinoma

Lack of Immunohistochemical Detection of VEGF in Prostate Carcinoma Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/appliedimmunohist by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVA5KvPVPZ0P5BEgU+IUTEfzO/GUWifn2IfwcEVVH9SSn on 06/10/2020 RESEARCH ARTICLE Lack of Immunohistochemical Detection of VEGF in Prostate Carcinoma Anitha Kamath, MD,* Mary Helie, BS,* Carlo B. Bifulco, MD,* William W. Li, MD,w John Concato, MD, MS, MPH,zy and Dhanpat Jain, MD* either benign or malignant glands. The reasons for the granular Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has and nonspecific staining are unclear at present. Our study may been implicated in tumor angiogenesis and is a potential help to explain variable results reported in previous studies, and therapeutic target in prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa). Immuno- suggests caution in interpreting VEGF expression in studies of histochemical (IHC) analysis has been used to demonstrate VEGF PrCa and benign glands. expression in PrCa, and in various other tumors including breast Key Words: prostate cancer, VEGF, angiogenesis carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and gliomas. Prior studies have reported markedly varied VEGF (Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol 2009;17:227–232) expression in benign prostatic hyperplasia (0% to 100%) and PrCa (40% to 100%). The objective of this study was to measure VEGF expression in PrCa specimens, using IHC analysis with antibodies from different manufacturers and different antigen ascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular retrieval techniques. Vpermeability factor is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Immunohistochemistry & Molecular Morphology Wolters Kluwer Health

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN
1541-2016
DOI
10.1097/PAI.0b013e31818f9e7f
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/appliedimmunohist by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVA5KvPVPZ0P5BEgU+IUTEfzO/GUWifn2IfwcEVVH9SSn on 06/10/2020 RESEARCH ARTICLE Lack of Immunohistochemical Detection of VEGF in Prostate Carcinoma Anitha Kamath, MD,* Mary Helie, BS,* Carlo B. Bifulco, MD,* William W. Li, MD,w John Concato, MD, MS, MPH,zy and Dhanpat Jain, MD* either benign or malignant glands. The reasons for the granular Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has and nonspecific staining are unclear at present. Our study may been implicated in tumor angiogenesis and is a potential help to explain variable results reported in previous studies, and therapeutic target in prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa). Immuno- suggests caution in interpreting VEGF expression in studies of histochemical (IHC) analysis has been used to demonstrate VEGF PrCa and benign glands. expression in PrCa, and in various other tumors including breast Key Words: prostate cancer, VEGF, angiogenesis carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and gliomas. Prior studies have reported markedly varied VEGF (Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol 2009;17:227–232) expression in benign prostatic hyperplasia (0% to 100%) and PrCa (40% to 100%). The objective of this study was to measure VEGF expression in PrCa specimens, using IHC analysis with antibodies from different manufacturers and different antigen ascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular retrieval techniques. Vpermeability factor is

Journal

Applied Immunohistochemistry & Molecular MorphologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: May 1, 2009

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