Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Knee Injuries

Knee Injuries Knee injuries are common complaints in patients presenting to the emergency department. An un- derstanding of the pathogenesis and symptoms of these injuries helps the nurse practitioner recog- nize, treat, and refer patients appropriately. This article outlines the pathophysiology and symptoms of injuries of the knee including fractures, dislocations, subluxation, ligamentous injuries, bone tu- mors, meniscal tears, extensor mechanism tendinopathy and disruption, bursitis, popliteal cysts, and osteoarthritis. Specific knee injury grading and classification will also be reviewed. Key words: condyle, femur, ligament, meniscus, patella, tibia NEE injuries are the fifth leading medial condylar joints (Simon, Sherman, & health complaint within the United Koenigsknecht, 2007). There are four liga- States (Dascola & Ward, 2005). More ments that help to provide the stabilization of than 2.5 million people sought care from their the knee joint: the anterior cruciate ligament primary care provider in 2000 for knee in- (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), me- juries (Dascola & Ward, 2005). Knee injuries dial collateral ligament (MCL), and the lat- are often seen and treated within the emer- eral collateral ligament (LCL). Figure 1 depicts gency department. A thorough understand- the normal knee anatomy. In addition, the ing of common knee ailments is important http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal Wolters Kluwer Health

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wolters-kluwer-health/knee-injuries-6SxfJ0X42A
Copyright
© 2007 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN
1931-4485
eISSN
1931-4493
DOI
10.1097/01.TME.0000286962.94287.06

Abstract

Knee injuries are common complaints in patients presenting to the emergency department. An un- derstanding of the pathogenesis and symptoms of these injuries helps the nurse practitioner recog- nize, treat, and refer patients appropriately. This article outlines the pathophysiology and symptoms of injuries of the knee including fractures, dislocations, subluxation, ligamentous injuries, bone tu- mors, meniscal tears, extensor mechanism tendinopathy and disruption, bursitis, popliteal cysts, and osteoarthritis. Specific knee injury grading and classification will also be reviewed. Key words: condyle, femur, ligament, meniscus, patella, tibia NEE injuries are the fifth leading medial condylar joints (Simon, Sherman, & health complaint within the United Koenigsknecht, 2007). There are four liga- States (Dascola & Ward, 2005). More ments that help to provide the stabilization of than 2.5 million people sought care from their the knee joint: the anterior cruciate ligament primary care provider in 2000 for knee in- (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), me- juries (Dascola & Ward, 2005). Knee injuries dial collateral ligament (MCL), and the lat- are often seen and treated within the emer- eral collateral ligament (LCL). Figure 1 depicts gency department. A thorough understand- the normal knee anatomy. In addition, the ing of common knee ailments is important

Journal

Advanced Emergency Nursing JournalWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jul 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.