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Inflammatory Puzzle ... What Is the Missing Piece?

Inflammatory Puzzle ... What Is the Missing Piece? LETTER TO THE E DITOR Inflammatory Puzzle . . . What Is the Missing Piece? Deborah Doherty, PT, PhD Department Chair—Human Movement Science and Associate Professor, Oakland University, Rochester, MI. What if we could change the trajectory of the can- sociation between increasing soluble tumor necrosis factor cer and chemotherapy-induced inflammatory process to receptors 1 (sTNF-RI) and 2 (sTNF-RII) concentrations prevent balance impairments or, at least, decrease the inci- and declines in short-term memory in patients with breast dence and severity of balance impairments, thus reducing cancer during treatment. This cognitive decline did not the risk of falls? end after treatment was over. van der Willik et al found It is well established that treatment of cancer causes that survivors 20 years after treatment of cancer continue adverse effects that increase the risk for balance impair- to have increased levels of inflammation associated with ments and falls. Stubblefield reports cardiotoxicity, hy- lower cognitive performance. Chemotherapy-induced potension, loss of bone density, myalgia/arthralgia, periph- ocular toxicities cause significant inflammation that eral neuropathy, sarcopenia, vestibulotoxicity, and vision impairs vision via numerous complications; for example, changes as potential toxicities that contribute to balance. uveitis, conjunctivitis, epiphora, keratitis, photophobia, 5,6 The American Cancer Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rehabilitation Oncology Wolters Kluwer Health

Inflammatory Puzzle ... What Is the Missing Piece?

Rehabilitation Oncology , Volume 39 (1) – Jan 1, 2021

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
© 2021 Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy, APTA.
ISSN
2168-3808
eISSN
2381-2427
DOI
10.1097/01.REO.0000000000000252
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LETTER TO THE E DITOR Inflammatory Puzzle . . . What Is the Missing Piece? Deborah Doherty, PT, PhD Department Chair—Human Movement Science and Associate Professor, Oakland University, Rochester, MI. What if we could change the trajectory of the can- sociation between increasing soluble tumor necrosis factor cer and chemotherapy-induced inflammatory process to receptors 1 (sTNF-RI) and 2 (sTNF-RII) concentrations prevent balance impairments or, at least, decrease the inci- and declines in short-term memory in patients with breast dence and severity of balance impairments, thus reducing cancer during treatment. This cognitive decline did not the risk of falls? end after treatment was over. van der Willik et al found It is well established that treatment of cancer causes that survivors 20 years after treatment of cancer continue adverse effects that increase the risk for balance impair- to have increased levels of inflammation associated with ments and falls. Stubblefield reports cardiotoxicity, hy- lower cognitive performance. Chemotherapy-induced potension, loss of bone density, myalgia/arthralgia, periph- ocular toxicities cause significant inflammation that eral neuropathy, sarcopenia, vestibulotoxicity, and vision impairs vision via numerous complications; for example, changes as potential toxicities that contribute to balance. uveitis, conjunctivitis, epiphora, keratitis, photophobia, 5,6 The American Cancer Society

Journal

Rehabilitation OncologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jan 1, 2021

References