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Infectious mononucleosis

Infectious mononucleosis Downloaded from https://pdfs.journals.lww.com/jaapa by BhDMf5ePHKZxZb3ruX4b9cKfbT5h3bp+v9gTtSlrchDWvVTxyN8Hif2P/rPZfAxb8td684/2m6Qj/1S0ZObgiiKJ9vD64yNdY1wI1G/v4gN3ti1fujtTJsg5898WZFuC on 02/23/2019 QUICK RECERTIFIC ATION SERIES Joel Schwartzkopf, PA-C, MPAS GENERAL FEATURES DIAGNOSIS • Infectious mononucleosis is a viral disease that classically • A thorough history and physical examination are impor- presents with the triad of fever, lymphadenopathy, and tant for accurate clinical diagnosis. pharyngitis. • Laboratory testing includes the rapid Monospot test, • Most acute infections are caused by the Epstein-Barr which detects the presence of heterophile antibodies and virus (EBV). is highly specifi c for EBV. Sensitivity is decreased early • Most adults in the United States are positive for antibod- in the illness but improves after the fi rst week of acute ies to EBV, and most patients gain exposure in early infection and peaks at 2 to 5 weeks. childhood without ever showing acute symptoms. Single • EBV-specifi c antibody testing is available but generally exposure to EBV confers lifelong immunity. should be reserved for patients with chronic or persistent • Typical acute presentation involves a patient in mid- to symptoms in which the diagnosis of mononucleosis is late adolescence; acute infection is rare in patients over uncertain. age 30 years. • Obtain a complete blood cell count with manual http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of PAs Wolters Kluwer Health

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN
1547-1896
eISSN
0893-7400
DOI
10.1097/01.JAA.0000546488.73851.dd
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from https://pdfs.journals.lww.com/jaapa by BhDMf5ePHKZxZb3ruX4b9cKfbT5h3bp+v9gTtSlrchDWvVTxyN8Hif2P/rPZfAxb8td684/2m6Qj/1S0ZObgiiKJ9vD64yNdY1wI1G/v4gN3ti1fujtTJsg5898WZFuC on 02/23/2019 QUICK RECERTIFIC ATION SERIES Joel Schwartzkopf, PA-C, MPAS GENERAL FEATURES DIAGNOSIS • Infectious mononucleosis is a viral disease that classically • A thorough history and physical examination are impor- presents with the triad of fever, lymphadenopathy, and tant for accurate clinical diagnosis. pharyngitis. • Laboratory testing includes the rapid Monospot test, • Most acute infections are caused by the Epstein-Barr which detects the presence of heterophile antibodies and virus (EBV). is highly specifi c for EBV. Sensitivity is decreased early • Most adults in the United States are positive for antibod- in the illness but improves after the fi rst week of acute ies to EBV, and most patients gain exposure in early infection and peaks at 2 to 5 weeks. childhood without ever showing acute symptoms. Single • EBV-specifi c antibody testing is available but generally exposure to EBV confers lifelong immunity. should be reserved for patients with chronic or persistent • Typical acute presentation involves a patient in mid- to symptoms in which the diagnosis of mononucleosis is late adolescence; acute infection is rare in patients over uncertain. age 30 years. • Obtain a complete blood cell count with manual

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of PAsWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Nov 1, 2018

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