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In This Issue ROLE OF SELECT GENETIC VARIANTS IN LUNG CANCER RISK IN AFRICAN AMERICANS The disparities between African Americans and whites in lung cancer incidence and mortality prompted efforts to further understand the underlying biological differences. Spitz and colleagues have previously shown that African Americans with prior emphysema have higher risks of lung cancer compared with white lung cancer patients. The present study, therefore, included a panel of 1440 inflammatory gene variants in a two-phase analy- sis (discovery and replication), top Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) hits from lung cancer in whites, and 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from a published gene panel. This study would also evaluate the addition of select genetic hits in improving their risk prediction models for African Americans. The findings revealed 154 significant SNPs in inflammation, and one in REV1 (suggested role in translesion synthesis), and three GWAS hits (2 in the 15q locus and 1 in the HTERT locus) in the discovery set, and one replicated inflammation SNP between IRF4 and EXOC2. This study has demonstrated that incorporating these SNPs into risk-prediction models did not improve the model perfor- mance substantially or present any clinical relevance for African American lung cancer cases. The analysis suggested the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Thoracic Oncology Wolters Kluwer Health

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Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
ISSN
1556-0864
DOI
10.1097/JTO.0b013e31828ab04a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ROLE OF SELECT GENETIC VARIANTS IN LUNG CANCER RISK IN AFRICAN AMERICANS The disparities between African Americans and whites in lung cancer incidence and mortality prompted efforts to further understand the underlying biological differences. Spitz and colleagues have previously shown that African Americans with prior emphysema have higher risks of lung cancer compared with white lung cancer patients. The present study, therefore, included a panel of 1440 inflammatory gene variants in a two-phase analy- sis (discovery and replication), top Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) hits from lung cancer in whites, and 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from a published gene panel. This study would also evaluate the addition of select genetic hits in improving their risk prediction models for African Americans. The findings revealed 154 significant SNPs in inflammation, and one in REV1 (suggested role in translesion synthesis), and three GWAS hits (2 in the 15q locus and 1 in the HTERT locus) in the discovery set, and one replicated inflammation SNP between IRF4 and EXOC2. This study has demonstrated that incorporating these SNPs into risk-prediction models did not improve the model perfor- mance substantially or present any clinical relevance for African American lung cancer cases. The analysis suggested the

Journal

Journal of Thoracic OncologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Apr 1, 2013

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