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High-Intensity Interval Training for Reducing Cancer-Related Fatigue in Survivors of Cancer: Challenges and Solutions for Translation and Implementation in Cancer Rehabilitation

High-Intensity Interval Training for Reducing Cancer-Related Fatigue in Survivors of Cancer:... Moderate-intensity continuous aerobic exercise training (MICT) is used to help alleviate symptoms of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in many cancer rehabilitation programs. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has become increasingly popular, including several research studies demonstrating promising effects of HIIT on CRF among patients and survivors of cancer. However, we propose that 2 primary limitations exist in the current literature that must be addressed before HIIT should be translated from research studies and implemented in cancer rehabilitation. These limitations are the lack of generalizability of this research and a paucity of studies that have directly compared MICT with HIIT while matching for total exercise volume. In this commentary, we expand on the rationale for the proposed limitations and provide suggestions for future research directions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rehabilitation Oncology Wolters Kluwer Health

High-Intensity Interval Training for Reducing Cancer-Related Fatigue in Survivors of Cancer: Challenges and Solutions for Translation and Implementation in Cancer Rehabilitation

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
© 2022 Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy, APTA.
ISSN
2168-3808
eISSN
2381-2427
DOI
10.1097/01.reo.0000000000000288
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Moderate-intensity continuous aerobic exercise training (MICT) is used to help alleviate symptoms of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in many cancer rehabilitation programs. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has become increasingly popular, including several research studies demonstrating promising effects of HIIT on CRF among patients and survivors of cancer. However, we propose that 2 primary limitations exist in the current literature that must be addressed before HIIT should be translated from research studies and implemented in cancer rehabilitation. These limitations are the lack of generalizability of this research and a paucity of studies that have directly compared MICT with HIIT while matching for total exercise volume. In this commentary, we expand on the rationale for the proposed limitations and provide suggestions for future research directions.

Journal

Rehabilitation OncologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Apr 8, 2022

References