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Electronic Referral: A Better Way to Connect

Electronic Referral: A Better Way to Connect Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/apjoo by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVA5KvPVPZ0P5BEgU+IUTEfzO/GUWifn2IfwcEVVH9SSn on 06/03/2020 Editorial Wei Xiao, MD, PhD,* and Mingguang He, MD, PhD, FRANZCO† ggregated data from the surveys of 39 countries estimated there to be 285 million people with visual impairment, Aand 39 million with blindness worldwide, making vision loss the third leading impairment by the number of indi- viduals affected, only second to anemia and hearing loss. Fortunately, not all ocular diseases require the sophisticated diagnosis and treatment conducted by skilled ophthalmologists. t o better allocate eye care resources, a system inte- grating primary, secondary, and tertiary care was conceptualized and has been widely advocated by the World Health organization and the international agency for the Prevention of Blindness global initiatives, VISION 2020: The Right 3,4 5 to Sight and the subsequent Universal Eye Health: A Global Action Plan 2014–2019. the delivery of specialist-driven eye care remains challenging in both resource-rich and resource-poor settings. a co-management and referral system, integrating general practitioners, optometrists, and ophthalmologists, would en- able target referral that would perhaps maximize time utilization by ophthalmologists. However, the efficiency of this system could be hindered by an outdated paper-based methodology. With a paper-based system, it is also impossible to transfer or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Asia-Pacific Journal of Ophthalmology Wolters Kluwer Health

Electronic Referral: A Better Way to Connect

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN
2162-0989
eISSN
2475-5028
DOI
10.22608/APO.2016216
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/apjoo by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVA5KvPVPZ0P5BEgU+IUTEfzO/GUWifn2IfwcEVVH9SSn on 06/03/2020 Editorial Wei Xiao, MD, PhD,* and Mingguang He, MD, PhD, FRANZCO† ggregated data from the surveys of 39 countries estimated there to be 285 million people with visual impairment, Aand 39 million with blindness worldwide, making vision loss the third leading impairment by the number of indi- viduals affected, only second to anemia and hearing loss. Fortunately, not all ocular diseases require the sophisticated diagnosis and treatment conducted by skilled ophthalmologists. t o better allocate eye care resources, a system inte- grating primary, secondary, and tertiary care was conceptualized and has been widely advocated by the World Health organization and the international agency for the Prevention of Blindness global initiatives, VISION 2020: The Right 3,4 5 to Sight and the subsequent Universal Eye Health: A Global Action Plan 2014–2019. the delivery of specialist-driven eye care remains challenging in both resource-rich and resource-poor settings. a co-management and referral system, integrating general practitioners, optometrists, and ophthalmologists, would en- able target referral that would perhaps maximize time utilization by ophthalmologists. However, the efficiency of this system could be hindered by an outdated paper-based methodology. With a paper-based system, it is also impossible to transfer or

Journal

The Asia-Pacific Journal of OphthalmologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jan 1, 2017

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