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Effect of Common Medications on Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

Effect of Common Medications on Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema PERSPECTIVE P APER Effect of Common Medications on Breast Cancer–Related Lymphedema 1 2 Emily Tesar, MSN, RN, OCN ; Jane M. Armer, PhD, RN, CLT, FAAN 1 2 Doctoral Student (PhD), University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing, Billings, MT; and Professor, University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing, and Director, American Lymphedema Framework Project, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO Background: It is estimated that 15% to 28% of breast cancer survivors suffer from breast cancer–related lym- phedema (BCRL). As the population of survivors grows, so does their risk for developing other chronic diseases such as cardiac disease, type II diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and other cancers. Minimal literature exists about the effect that medications taken for other chronic conditions have on BCRL. AIMS: The purpose of this article is to highlight how common medications can impact peripheral and generalized edema, thereby contributing to lymphedema, and outline ongoing research. Methods: This article also identifies 6 classifications of chronic disease medications with known profiles for potentiating edema that could mimic or exacerbate lymphedema. (Rehab Oncol 2018;36:7–12) Key words: anticancer agents, antidepressants, an- tidiabetics, antineuralgics, calcium channel blockers, edema, lymphedema, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories With advancements in cancer treatment, there are an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rehabilitation Oncology Wolters Kluwer Health

Effect of Common Medications on Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

Rehabilitation Oncology , Volume 36 (1) – Jan 1, 2018

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN
2168-3808
eISSN
2381-2427
DOI
10.1097/01.REO.0000000000000105
Publisher site
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Abstract

PERSPECTIVE P APER Effect of Common Medications on Breast Cancer–Related Lymphedema 1 2 Emily Tesar, MSN, RN, OCN ; Jane M. Armer, PhD, RN, CLT, FAAN 1 2 Doctoral Student (PhD), University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing, Billings, MT; and Professor, University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing, and Director, American Lymphedema Framework Project, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO Background: It is estimated that 15% to 28% of breast cancer survivors suffer from breast cancer–related lym- phedema (BCRL). As the population of survivors grows, so does their risk for developing other chronic diseases such as cardiac disease, type II diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and other cancers. Minimal literature exists about the effect that medications taken for other chronic conditions have on BCRL. AIMS: The purpose of this article is to highlight how common medications can impact peripheral and generalized edema, thereby contributing to lymphedema, and outline ongoing research. Methods: This article also identifies 6 classifications of chronic disease medications with known profiles for potentiating edema that could mimic or exacerbate lymphedema. (Rehab Oncol 2018;36:7–12) Key words: anticancer agents, antidepressants, an- tidiabetics, antineuralgics, calcium channel blockers, edema, lymphedema, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories With advancements in cancer treatment, there are an

Journal

Rehabilitation OncologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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