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Drug‐induced stroke

Drug‐induced stroke Drugs can sometimes cause ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. Some drugs, e.g. the oral contraceptive pill, can increase the tendency to form clots; others, such as cocaine, may cause a cerebral vasculitis. Effects on cerebral perfusion from increased blood pressure (with cocaine) or reduced blood pressure (with antihypertensive agents) sometimes lead to stroke. Haemorrhage is a well‐recognised consequence of treatment with anticoagulants, fibrinolytic agents, and occasionally anti‐platelet agents. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Adverse Drug Reaction Bulletin Wolters Kluwer Health

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Copyright
0044‐6394 © 2000 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN
0044-6394
eISSN
2159-7774

Abstract

Drugs can sometimes cause ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. Some drugs, e.g. the oral contraceptive pill, can increase the tendency to form clots; others, such as cocaine, may cause a cerebral vasculitis. Effects on cerebral perfusion from increased blood pressure (with cocaine) or reduced blood pressure (with antihypertensive agents) sometimes lead to stroke. Haemorrhage is a well‐recognised consequence of treatment with anticoagulants, fibrinolytic agents, and occasionally anti‐platelet agents.

Journal

Adverse Drug Reaction BulletinWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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