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Childhood Blindness: More Useful Evidence From Blind School Survey

Childhood Blindness: More Useful Evidence From Blind School Survey Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/apjoo by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVA5KvPVPZ0P5BEgU+IUTEfzO/GUWifn2IfwcEVVH9SSn on 06/02/2020 EDITORIAL Childhood Blindness: More Useful Evidence From Blind School Survey Xinxing Guo, MD, PhD,* and Mingguang He, MD, PhD, FRANZCO*† he latest World Health Organization (WHO) data show that childhood blindness (BL) accounts for T 4% of the causes of BL globally. Although the prevalence of BL among children is estimated to be approximately 0.75%, which is only one tenth of that in adults, its impact can be detrimental in the way that it affects educational opportunities, employment, and personal and social disability throughout life. Childhood BL is the second greatest cause of blind-person years; with around 1.4 million blind children worldwide, approximately 70 million blind-person years are caused by childhood BL. Of these blind children, 93.5% live in middle- and low-income countries. Previous research has shown that up to 50% of childhood BL worldwide might be either avoidable or even treatable. Thus, the control of child- hood BL has been identified as a priority of the WHO global initiative for the elimination of avoidable BL by the year 2020. Substantial regional differences have been identified in the major causes of childhood BL. The leading cause of BL in low-income countries is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Asia-Pacific Journal of Ophthalmology Wolters Kluwer Health

Childhood Blindness: More Useful Evidence From Blind School Survey

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN
2162-0989
eISSN
2475-5028
DOI
10.1097/APO.0000000000000159
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/apjoo by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVA5KvPVPZ0P5BEgU+IUTEfzO/GUWifn2IfwcEVVH9SSn on 06/02/2020 EDITORIAL Childhood Blindness: More Useful Evidence From Blind School Survey Xinxing Guo, MD, PhD,* and Mingguang He, MD, PhD, FRANZCO*† he latest World Health Organization (WHO) data show that childhood blindness (BL) accounts for T 4% of the causes of BL globally. Although the prevalence of BL among children is estimated to be approximately 0.75%, which is only one tenth of that in adults, its impact can be detrimental in the way that it affects educational opportunities, employment, and personal and social disability throughout life. Childhood BL is the second greatest cause of blind-person years; with around 1.4 million blind children worldwide, approximately 70 million blind-person years are caused by childhood BL. Of these blind children, 93.5% live in middle- and low-income countries. Previous research has shown that up to 50% of childhood BL worldwide might be either avoidable or even treatable. Thus, the control of child- hood BL has been identified as a priority of the WHO global initiative for the elimination of avoidable BL by the year 2020. Substantial regional differences have been identified in the major causes of childhood BL. The leading cause of BL in low-income countries is

Journal

The Asia-Pacific Journal of OphthalmologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Dec 1, 2015

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