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Calvarial Thickness and Its Relation to Cranial Bone Harvest

Calvarial Thickness and Its Relation to Cranial Bone Harvest PEDIATRIC/CRANIOFACIAL Calvarial Thickness and Its Relation to Cranial Bone Harvest Andrea Moreira-Gonzalez, Background: The purpose of this study was to define the variability in skull M.D. thickness from location to location and from individual to individual in a large Francis E. Papay, M.D. number of human skulls. James E. Zins, M.D. Method: Skull thickness was measured in multiple areas of the calvaria in 281 Cleveland, Ohio dry skulls from the Hamman-Todd osteological collection (Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio). A total of 40 points were determined over the frontal, occipital, and parietal bones, with a higher number of points concentrated on the latter. Repeated measures analysis of variance models were used to assess the effects of covariates (individual variables) on skull thickness and location. Result: A statistically significant pattern of increased thickness toward the pos- terior parietal bones was seen in all subgroups. The mean thickness of the skull across all locations was 6.32 mm (SEM, 0.07 mm) and ranged from 5.3 mm (SEM, 0.09 mm) to 7.5 mm (SEM, 0.09 mm). Age was not found to be a significant predictor of mean skull thickness. Differences between male and female skulls were greater toward the rear of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Wolters Kluwer Health

Calvarial Thickness and Its Relation to Cranial Bone Harvest

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References (25)

ISSN
0032-1052
eISSN
1529-4242
DOI
10.1097/01.prs.0000209933.78532.a7
pmid
16651971
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PEDIATRIC/CRANIOFACIAL Calvarial Thickness and Its Relation to Cranial Bone Harvest Andrea Moreira-Gonzalez, Background: The purpose of this study was to define the variability in skull M.D. thickness from location to location and from individual to individual in a large Francis E. Papay, M.D. number of human skulls. James E. Zins, M.D. Method: Skull thickness was measured in multiple areas of the calvaria in 281 Cleveland, Ohio dry skulls from the Hamman-Todd osteological collection (Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio). A total of 40 points were determined over the frontal, occipital, and parietal bones, with a higher number of points concentrated on the latter. Repeated measures analysis of variance models were used to assess the effects of covariates (individual variables) on skull thickness and location. Result: A statistically significant pattern of increased thickness toward the pos- terior parietal bones was seen in all subgroups. The mean thickness of the skull across all locations was 6.32 mm (SEM, 0.07 mm) and ranged from 5.3 mm (SEM, 0.09 mm) to 7.5 mm (SEM, 0.09 mm). Age was not found to be a significant predictor of mean skull thickness. Differences between male and female skulls were greater toward the rear of the

Journal

Plastic & Reconstructive SurgeryWolters Kluwer Health

Published: May 1, 2006

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