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Behavioral Change Strategies to Improve Physical Activity After Cancer Treatment

Behavioral Change Strategies to Improve Physical Activity After Cancer Treatment PERSPECTIVE P APER Behavioral Change Strategies to Improve Physical Activity After Cancer Treatment 1 2 Amy M. Berkman, BA ; Susan C. Gilchrist, MD, MS 1 2 Medical student, Larner College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT; and Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention & Cardiology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of mortality among cancer survivors and promotes heart health in a population of patients with cancer at risk for cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, the majority of cancer survivors do not meet national physical activity guidelines. A wide range of strategies, including education, coaching, and behavioral change theories, have been used in interventions aimed at increasing physical activity among cancer survivors. We sought to review the most compelling practices to inform oncol- ogy rehabilitation programs focused on improving physical activity among cancer survivors. We identify both effective and ineffective strategies for behavioral change, as well as highlight areas where more research fo- cus is needed to improve physical activity among cancer survivors. (Rehab Oncol 2018;36:152–160) Key words: cancer survivors, oncology rehabilitation, physical activity Physical activity is a well-known strategy to prevent However, despite the consistent evidence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rehabilitation Oncology Wolters Kluwer Health

Behavioral Change Strategies to Improve Physical Activity After Cancer Treatment

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN
2168-3808
eISSN
2381-2427
DOI
10.1097/01.REO.0000000000000112
Publisher site
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Abstract

PERSPECTIVE P APER Behavioral Change Strategies to Improve Physical Activity After Cancer Treatment 1 2 Amy M. Berkman, BA ; Susan C. Gilchrist, MD, MS 1 2 Medical student, Larner College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT; and Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention & Cardiology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of mortality among cancer survivors and promotes heart health in a population of patients with cancer at risk for cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, the majority of cancer survivors do not meet national physical activity guidelines. A wide range of strategies, including education, coaching, and behavioral change theories, have been used in interventions aimed at increasing physical activity among cancer survivors. We sought to review the most compelling practices to inform oncol- ogy rehabilitation programs focused on improving physical activity among cancer survivors. We identify both effective and ineffective strategies for behavioral change, as well as highlight areas where more research fo- cus is needed to improve physical activity among cancer survivors. (Rehab Oncol 2018;36:152–160) Key words: cancer survivors, oncology rehabilitation, physical activity Physical activity is a well-known strategy to prevent However, despite the consistent evidence

Journal

Rehabilitation OncologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jul 1, 2018

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