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Work resumption and retention in patients with advanced cancer: Experiences and perspectives of general and occupational health care professionals

Work resumption and retention in patients with advanced cancer: Experiences and perspectives of... INTRODUCTIONImprovements in screening and treatment are enabling cancer patients to live longer and with better quality of life, even in the face of advanced (i.e., incurable, usually metastatic) disease (American Cancer Society, 2021; Kassianos et al., 2018; Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization, 2020). Due to these improvements, patients with advanced cancer and involved general and occupational health care professionals are increasingly faced with questions pertaining to work resumption and work retention. Cancer patients may wish, or feel financially incentivised, to continue their working lives (Chow et al., 2015; Greidanus et al., 2018; Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization, 2020). Studies among cancer patients have indicated that being in paid employment enhances patients' financial security and offers social support, which can contribute to their overall quality of life (Duijts et al., 2017; Faas, 2018; Mills & Payne, 2015; Nachreiner et al., 2007). Moreover, the ability to work can offer cancer patients a sense of identity and purpose (Chow et al., 2015; Faas, 2018; Greidanus et al., 2018). However, many cancer patients experience barriers when resuming work during or after treatment, for example, fatigue (Nielsen et al., 2019; Paltrinieri et al., 2018; Zegers et al., 2022). For those with advanced cancer, additional barriers may arise due to disease progression, symptom burden, and/or ongoing (palliative) treatments (Glare et al., 2014).Being diagnosed with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

Work resumption and retention in patients with advanced cancer: Experiences and perspectives of general and occupational health care professionals

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13714
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONImprovements in screening and treatment are enabling cancer patients to live longer and with better quality of life, even in the face of advanced (i.e., incurable, usually metastatic) disease (American Cancer Society, 2021; Kassianos et al., 2018; Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization, 2020). Due to these improvements, patients with advanced cancer and involved general and occupational health care professionals are increasingly faced with questions pertaining to work resumption and work retention. Cancer patients may wish, or feel financially incentivised, to continue their working lives (Chow et al., 2015; Greidanus et al., 2018; Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization, 2020). Studies among cancer patients have indicated that being in paid employment enhances patients' financial security and offers social support, which can contribute to their overall quality of life (Duijts et al., 2017; Faas, 2018; Mills & Payne, 2015; Nachreiner et al., 2007). Moreover, the ability to work can offer cancer patients a sense of identity and purpose (Chow et al., 2015; Faas, 2018; Greidanus et al., 2018). However, many cancer patients experience barriers when resuming work during or after treatment, for example, fatigue (Nielsen et al., 2019; Paltrinieri et al., 2018; Zegers et al., 2022). For those with advanced cancer, additional barriers may arise due to disease progression, symptom burden, and/or ongoing (palliative) treatments (Glare et al., 2014).Being diagnosed with

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2022

Keywords: advanced cancer; metastatic; palliative care; qualitative research; return to work

References