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William Kinderman, The Creative Process in Music from Mozart to Kurtág (Urbana, Chicago and Springfield: University of Illinois Press, 2012). xi + 233 pp. $65.00. ISBN 978‐0‐252‐03716‐0 (hb.)

William Kinderman, The Creative Process in Music from Mozart to Kurtág (Urbana, Chicago and... A fault line runs through the literature on musical creativity which in part mirrors the change in conception of the composer from craftsman to genius which occurred towards the end of the eighteenth century, personified most vividly in the figures of Haydn and Beethoven respectively. On the one hand are those studies which, from a broadly psychological perspective, explore creativity: as a skill and an aptitude, a propensity inherent in all members of our species which can be developed with training and application. On the other are those which adopt a musicological perspective towards the creative process: how major figures in the Western canon arrived at works which, to present‐day listeners as much as to their initial audiences, appear profoundly mysterious and transcendent and which seem to stem from some ineffable realm. While literature in both categories aims at demystification, the methodologies and scope of each are naturally divergent: the former is essentially empirical, the latter palaeographic. The study reviewed here is firmly in the second category and extends some of William Kinderman's earlier work. A richly Austro‐German‐Hungarian thread links its seven case studies, ‘[tracing] the continuity of a central European tradition that has displayed remarkable vitality for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

William Kinderman, The Creative Process in Music from Mozart to Kurtág (Urbana, Chicago and Springfield: University of Illinois Press, 2012). xi + 233 pp. $65.00. ISBN 978‐0‐252‐03716‐0 (hb.)

Music Analysis , Volume 33 (1) – Jan 1, 2014

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A fault line runs through the literature on musical creativity which in part mirrors the change in conception of the composer from craftsman to genius which occurred towards the end of the eighteenth century, personified most vividly in the figures of Haydn and Beethoven respectively. On the one hand are those studies which, from a broadly psychological perspective, explore creativity: as a skill and an aptitude, a propensity inherent in all members of our species which can be developed with training and application. On the other are those which adopt a musicological perspective towards the creative process: how major figures in the Western canon arrived at works which, to present‐day listeners as much as to their initial audiences, appear profoundly mysterious and transcendent and which seem to stem from some ineffable realm. While literature in both categories aims at demystification, the methodologies and scope of each are naturally divergent: the former is essentially empirical, the latter palaeographic. The study reviewed here is firmly in the second category and extends some of William Kinderman's earlier work. A richly Austro‐German‐Hungarian thread links its seven case studies, ‘[tracing] the continuity of a central European tradition that has displayed remarkable vitality for

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2014

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