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William Drabkin, A Reader’s Guide to Haydn’s Early String Quartets

William Drabkin, A Reader’s Guide to Haydn’s Early String Quartets ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2002. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK CRITICAL FORUM melodic material. Drabkin's reading of the opening bars of the slow movement of Op. 9 No. 1 is similarly revealing. Here again, he notes that the interaction of parts need not be considered in purely motivic terms. His comments, generously illustrated with annotated musical examples keyed to the written text, engage the reader's curiosity for further exploration beyond the passages he considers in detail. For instance, how might these analytical stories be continued for the relevant quartet Adagios, or indeed any other movement within each work? (In fact, the unfolding of registral space in relation to largescale design remains tantalisingly absent from Drabkin's more lengthy analyses of Op. 20, even though he makes continual reference to events in this domain.) And, more specifically, how does Haydn follow through the implications of the crossed parts (and silent first violin) at the opening of Op. 20 No. 2, or the `narrow registral band' that provides an expressive point of departure in Op. 20 No. 3? As well as opening up new avenues for research, Drabkin's approach typically succeeds in establishing a refreshingly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

William Drabkin, A Reader’s Guide to Haydn’s Early String Quartets

Music Analysis , Volume 21 (2) – Jul 1, 2002

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00158
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2002. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK CRITICAL FORUM melodic material. Drabkin's reading of the opening bars of the slow movement of Op. 9 No. 1 is similarly revealing. Here again, he notes that the interaction of parts need not be considered in purely motivic terms. His comments, generously illustrated with annotated musical examples keyed to the written text, engage the reader's curiosity for further exploration beyond the passages he considers in detail. For instance, how might these analytical stories be continued for the relevant quartet Adagios, or indeed any other movement within each work? (In fact, the unfolding of registral space in relation to largescale design remains tantalisingly absent from Drabkin's more lengthy analyses of Op. 20, even though he makes continual reference to events in this domain.) And, more specifically, how does Haydn follow through the implications of the crossed parts (and silent first violin) at the opening of Op. 20 No. 2, or the `narrow registral band' that provides an expressive point of departure in Op. 20 No. 3? As well as opening up new avenues for research, Drabkin's approach typically succeeds in establishing a refreshingly

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2002

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