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White matter microstructure predicts individual differences in infant fear (But not anger and sadness)

White matter microstructure predicts individual differences in infant fear (But not anger and... INTRODUCTIONEmotion‐related motivations can promote behaviors that enhance safety and protection; however, negative emotional expressions are not always adaptive and can lead to later behavioral problems (see Beauchaine & Hinshaw, 2008). Negative emotion is often linked to mood and behavior problems, with early emerging negativity being a key developmental risk factor for poor academic performance (Molfese et al., 2010; Stright et al., 2008) and social behaviors in childhood and adolescence (Sanson et al., 2004). A better understanding of the neural biomarkers underlying discrete negative emotions will allow for the improved identification of individuals at risk for negative emotional behaviors, dysregulation, and later psychopathology, thereby aiding in the development of targeted interventions early in life.Negative emotion in infantsA central tenet in Darwin's original thesis on human emotion, The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals (Darwin, 1872), is that emotions serve evolutionary functions that promote survival. Fear serves to protect us in the face of uncertainty or insecurity (Plutchik, 1980); anger motivates us to work toward or protect a goal or overcome an obstacle thwarting a goal (Frijda, 1986); sadness can elicit maternal caregiving when the infant is unable to meet his/her own needs (Buss & Kiel, 2004). As such, emotional expressions are biological http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Science Wiley

White matter microstructure predicts individual differences in infant fear (But not anger and sadness)

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN
1363-755X
eISSN
1467-7687
DOI
10.1111/desc.13340
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONEmotion‐related motivations can promote behaviors that enhance safety and protection; however, negative emotional expressions are not always adaptive and can lead to later behavioral problems (see Beauchaine & Hinshaw, 2008). Negative emotion is often linked to mood and behavior problems, with early emerging negativity being a key developmental risk factor for poor academic performance (Molfese et al., 2010; Stright et al., 2008) and social behaviors in childhood and adolescence (Sanson et al., 2004). A better understanding of the neural biomarkers underlying discrete negative emotions will allow for the improved identification of individuals at risk for negative emotional behaviors, dysregulation, and later psychopathology, thereby aiding in the development of targeted interventions early in life.Negative emotion in infantsA central tenet in Darwin's original thesis on human emotion, The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals (Darwin, 1872), is that emotions serve evolutionary functions that promote survival. Fear serves to protect us in the face of uncertainty or insecurity (Plutchik, 1980); anger motivates us to work toward or protect a goal or overcome an obstacle thwarting a goal (Frijda, 1986); sadness can elicit maternal caregiving when the infant is unable to meet his/her own needs (Buss & Kiel, 2004). As such, emotional expressions are biological

Journal

Developmental ScienceWiley

Published: Nov 11, 2022

Keywords: DTI; fear; infant emotion; neuroimaging

References