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Using Complex Set Theory for Tonal Analysis: an Introduction to the Tonalities Project

Using Complex Set Theory for Tonal Analysis: an Introduction to the Tonalities Project Music Analysis, 23/ii±iii (2004) 153 ß Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2005. Published by Blackwell Publishing, 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford OX4 2DQ, UK ANTHONY POPLE early twentieth-century musical styles than much previous analytical and critical writing has seemed to imply. For example, a distinction between tonality and atonality is widely felt to be both of great significance and virtually absolute. Two branches of theory (with their associated analytical practices) have been developed to allow the construction of tonal and atonal analytical interpretations of musical passages. Yet many works from this repertoire can be, and have been, addressed from both perspectives. At a different level, the distinction between canons of `modern music' and `popular classics' ± the former including much of Schoenberg's music, for example, and the latter much of Rachmaninov's ± is sorely in need of re-appraisal. While it is not the intention of this article to attempt such a critical re-appraisal, it provides a framework for technical discussion of the music that may allow this more readily to proceed. Moreover, the concept of `tonality' is itself problematic. It may seem farfetched to compare music analysis, of whatever kind, with deep-sea fishing. Yet, just as there are many fish in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Using Complex Set Theory for Tonal Analysis: an Introduction to the Tonalities Project

Music Analysis , Volume 23 (2‐3) – Jul 1, 2004

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/j.0262-5245.2004.00201.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Music Analysis, 23/ii±iii (2004) 153 ß Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2005. Published by Blackwell Publishing, 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford OX4 2DQ, UK ANTHONY POPLE early twentieth-century musical styles than much previous analytical and critical writing has seemed to imply. For example, a distinction between tonality and atonality is widely felt to be both of great significance and virtually absolute. Two branches of theory (with their associated analytical practices) have been developed to allow the construction of tonal and atonal analytical interpretations of musical passages. Yet many works from this repertoire can be, and have been, addressed from both perspectives. At a different level, the distinction between canons of `modern music' and `popular classics' ± the former including much of Schoenberg's music, for example, and the latter much of Rachmaninov's ± is sorely in need of re-appraisal. While it is not the intention of this article to attempt such a critical re-appraisal, it provides a framework for technical discussion of the music that may allow this more readily to proceed. Moreover, the concept of `tonality' is itself problematic. It may seem farfetched to compare music analysis, of whatever kind, with deep-sea fishing. Yet, just as there are many fish in

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2004

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