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Users' perspective on rehabilitation interventions for young adult cancer survivors: A group concept mapping study

Users' perspective on rehabilitation interventions for young adult cancer survivors: A group... INTRODUCTIONWorldwide, approximately 1 million young adults (18–39 years) are annually diagnosed with cancer. Due to improved cancer treatment, their 5‐year survival rate exceeds 80% (Barr et al., 2016). Young adult cancer survivors (YACS), comprising individuals who have completed primary cancer treatment, differ from older counterparts as they are in a phase of life where they develop identity, establish relationships, attend school or university, enter work life and establish their own families (Feuerstein, 2007; Janssen et al., 2021; Parsons et al., 2012; Warner et al., 2016; Zebrack, 2011). Hence, it is crucial to focus on YACS as a distinct group with needs different from those of other cancer survivors (Barnett et al., 2016; D'Agostino et al., 2011; Galán et al., 2018; Richter et al., 2015; Zebrack, 2009).YACS often encounter a multiplicity of physical and psychological late effects caused by cancer and its treatment, for example, fatigue, lymphoedema, concentration and memory problems, sexual problems and psychological distress. This challenges their everyday life as per activities of daily living and social participation, including education, work and leisure (Janssen et al., 2021). Despite growing awareness that YACS differ from older counterparts, limited attention has focused on age‐specific interventions addressing their specific needs (Telles, 2021). Given that YACS expectedly have a long life ahead of them, knowledge about http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

Users' perspective on rehabilitation interventions for young adult cancer survivors: A group concept mapping study

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13734
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONWorldwide, approximately 1 million young adults (18–39 years) are annually diagnosed with cancer. Due to improved cancer treatment, their 5‐year survival rate exceeds 80% (Barr et al., 2016). Young adult cancer survivors (YACS), comprising individuals who have completed primary cancer treatment, differ from older counterparts as they are in a phase of life where they develop identity, establish relationships, attend school or university, enter work life and establish their own families (Feuerstein, 2007; Janssen et al., 2021; Parsons et al., 2012; Warner et al., 2016; Zebrack, 2011). Hence, it is crucial to focus on YACS as a distinct group with needs different from those of other cancer survivors (Barnett et al., 2016; D'Agostino et al., 2011; Galán et al., 2018; Richter et al., 2015; Zebrack, 2009).YACS often encounter a multiplicity of physical and psychological late effects caused by cancer and its treatment, for example, fatigue, lymphoedema, concentration and memory problems, sexual problems and psychological distress. This challenges their everyday life as per activities of daily living and social participation, including education, work and leisure (Janssen et al., 2021). Despite growing awareness that YACS differ from older counterparts, limited attention has focused on age‐specific interventions addressing their specific needs (Telles, 2021). Given that YACS expectedly have a long life ahead of them, knowledge about

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2022

Keywords: cancer survivors; everyday life; health services; neoplasms; rehabilitation; young adult

References