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U nearthing the P ast : T heory and A rchaeology in R obert G jerdingen ' s M usic in the G alant S tyle

U nearthing the P ast : T heory and A rchaeology in R obert G jerdingen ' s M usic in the G alant... In the mid‐twentieth century, the British musicologist Charles Cudworth published a trifle of an article – a three‐page thought piece, really – that mused on an eighteenth‐century ‘mannerism’ which he deemed thoroughly galant in provenance: the eponymous cadence galante (1949). This cadence, a cliché used in musical works from roughly 1730 to 1780, operates in a metaphorical capacity in Cudworth's article, allowing him to hold a mirror up to several larger issues regarding eighteenth‐century music in general. To begin with, the cadence galante ‘is so markedly of its period that its inclusion in a work at once stamps that work as galant ’. This and ‘many kindred clichés ... help to identify the style and date of galant works ... approximately within the galant half‐century’, that is, 1730–80 ( Cudworth 1949 , p. 176). In other words, the markedness and frequent usage of galant mannerisms are restricted to a specific historical period. The corollary of this argument concerns the relative inaccessibility of these mannerisms to present‐day listeners. Because of their historical situatedness, their understanding, appreciation and very recognition are limited to listeners from the period of the clichés' greatest currency. Indeed, Cudworth qualifies the cadence galante as a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

U nearthing the P ast : T heory and A rchaeology in R obert G jerdingen ' s M usic in the G alant S tyle

Music Analysis , Volume 31 (1) – Mar 1, 2012

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/j.1468-2249.2012.00348.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the mid‐twentieth century, the British musicologist Charles Cudworth published a trifle of an article – a three‐page thought piece, really – that mused on an eighteenth‐century ‘mannerism’ which he deemed thoroughly galant in provenance: the eponymous cadence galante (1949). This cadence, a cliché used in musical works from roughly 1730 to 1780, operates in a metaphorical capacity in Cudworth's article, allowing him to hold a mirror up to several larger issues regarding eighteenth‐century music in general. To begin with, the cadence galante ‘is so markedly of its period that its inclusion in a work at once stamps that work as galant ’. This and ‘many kindred clichés ... help to identify the style and date of galant works ... approximately within the galant half‐century’, that is, 1730–80 ( Cudworth 1949 , p. 176). In other words, the markedness and frequent usage of galant mannerisms are restricted to a specific historical period. The corollary of this argument concerns the relative inaccessibility of these mannerisms to present‐day listeners. Because of their historical situatedness, their understanding, appreciation and very recognition are limited to listeners from the period of the clichés' greatest currency. Indeed, Cudworth qualifies the cadence galante as a

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2012

References