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‘Transcending Quotation’: Cross‐Cultural Musical Representation in Mauricio Kagel's Die Stücke der Windrose für Salonorchester

‘Transcending Quotation’: Cross‐Cultural Musical Representation in Mauricio Kagel's Die Stücke... Cross-cultural musical representation has been a hotly debated topic over the past decade. Whereas traditional research tended to focus on the expansion of the material of Western concert music, more recent approaches have emphasised the ideological aspect of references to non-Western music, ranging from acceptance as a fruitful synthesis in the sense of multiculturalism to suspicion of its being a manifestation of Western hegemony.3 While the critique of Western appropriations, notably in postcolonial theory, undoubtedly enabled a more informed debate, certain ideological assessments are founded less on analytical insight than judged a priori, thereby effectively by-passing the question of how representation is constituted musically. For example, in their introduction to Western Music and Its Others, Georgina Born and David Hesmondhalgh state that: Postcolonial analysis . . . sets a fruitful example for music studies in that it pays meticulous attention to textual detail, but always sees such analysis as subsidiary to the larger project of thinking through the implications of cultural expression for understanding asymmetrical power relations and concomitant processes of marginalization and denigration.4 It is hard to disagree with a programme that sounds so worthy, yet there is a danger that, by starting from the assumption that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

‘Transcending Quotation’: Cross‐Cultural Musical Representation in Mauricio Kagel's Die Stücke der Windrose für Salonorchester

Music Analysis , Volume 23 (1) – Mar 1, 2004

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/j.0262-5245.2004.00195.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cross-cultural musical representation has been a hotly debated topic over the past decade. Whereas traditional research tended to focus on the expansion of the material of Western concert music, more recent approaches have emphasised the ideological aspect of references to non-Western music, ranging from acceptance as a fruitful synthesis in the sense of multiculturalism to suspicion of its being a manifestation of Western hegemony.3 While the critique of Western appropriations, notably in postcolonial theory, undoubtedly enabled a more informed debate, certain ideological assessments are founded less on analytical insight than judged a priori, thereby effectively by-passing the question of how representation is constituted musically. For example, in their introduction to Western Music and Its Others, Georgina Born and David Hesmondhalgh state that: Postcolonial analysis . . . sets a fruitful example for music studies in that it pays meticulous attention to textual detail, but always sees such analysis as subsidiary to the larger project of thinking through the implications of cultural expression for understanding asymmetrical power relations and concomitant processes of marginalization and denigration.4 It is hard to disagree with a programme that sounds so worthy, yet there is a danger that, by starting from the assumption that

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2004

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