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Trajectories of symptom severity predicts quality of life change in newly diagnosis lymphoma survivors: An initial study

Trajectories of symptom severity predicts quality of life change in newly diagnosis lymphoma... INTRODUCTIONLymphoma is the leading hematologic malignancy. Non‐Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) comprise a wide variety of neoplasms arising from the lymphoid tissues. With an estimated 544,352 new cases and 259,793 deaths in 2020, lymphoma accounts for approximately 3% of all cancers worldwide (Sung et al., 2021). Advancements in treatment have resulted in a growing number of cancer survivors enjoying longer lifespans. During the last decade, the 5‐year relative survival rate was 73.2% for lymphoma (NCI, 2021). Unlike solid tumours, lymphoma can only be relieved and cured by chemotherapy. Although lymphoma has a higher rate of treatment success and survival than other types of cancer, its attributes are closely intertwined with the immunological functions of the body. Chemotherapy and its subsequent side effects result in lymphoma consuming more medical resources than other types of cancer. According to the National Health Insurance Administration Ministry of Health and Welfare's data (2020) on medical expenses from the National Health Insurance on malignant neoplasms, lymphoma incurs an average medical cost of NT$246,780 per patient, fourth only to leukaemia, oesophageal cancer and lung cancer in Taiwan. The short‐ or long‐term side effects of treatment include unpleasant experiences and mental and physical disturbances, which continue to undermine survivors' quality of life http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

Trajectories of symptom severity predicts quality of life change in newly diagnosis lymphoma survivors: An initial study

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13741
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONLymphoma is the leading hematologic malignancy. Non‐Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) comprise a wide variety of neoplasms arising from the lymphoid tissues. With an estimated 544,352 new cases and 259,793 deaths in 2020, lymphoma accounts for approximately 3% of all cancers worldwide (Sung et al., 2021). Advancements in treatment have resulted in a growing number of cancer survivors enjoying longer lifespans. During the last decade, the 5‐year relative survival rate was 73.2% for lymphoma (NCI, 2021). Unlike solid tumours, lymphoma can only be relieved and cured by chemotherapy. Although lymphoma has a higher rate of treatment success and survival than other types of cancer, its attributes are closely intertwined with the immunological functions of the body. Chemotherapy and its subsequent side effects result in lymphoma consuming more medical resources than other types of cancer. According to the National Health Insurance Administration Ministry of Health and Welfare's data (2020) on medical expenses from the National Health Insurance on malignant neoplasms, lymphoma incurs an average medical cost of NT$246,780 per patient, fourth only to leukaemia, oesophageal cancer and lung cancer in Taiwan. The short‐ or long‐term side effects of treatment include unpleasant experiences and mental and physical disturbances, which continue to undermine survivors' quality of life

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2022

Keywords: lymphoma survivors; predominant symptoms; quality of life; trajectories of symptom severity

References