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Toward a cumulative science of vocal markers of autism: A cross‐linguistic meta‐analysis‐based investigation of acoustic markers in American and Danish autistic children

Toward a cumulative science of vocal markers of autism: A cross‐linguistic meta‐analysis‐based... INTRODUCTIONAtypical prosody and voice are commonly reported aspects of the speech of people with autism, which has been characterized as flat, sing‐songy, pedantic, hollow, inappropriate, hoarse, or hyper‐nasal (Asperger, 1991; Baltaxe & Simmons, 1975; Goldfarb et al., 1956; Kanner, 1943; Pronovost et al., 1966). Indeed, distinctive prosody is part of the diagnostic criteria in the ICD‐10 and in the ADOS‐2 assessment for autism (Lord et al., 2009; World Health Organization, 1992) and is indicated as one of the earliest‐appearing markers of a possible autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis (Oller et al., 2010). These vocal factors may play a role in the socio‐communicative impairments associated with the disorder. In addition to potentially impeding effective communication of, for example, emotional content (Travis & Sigman, 1998), they also generate negative responses from neurotypical (NT) raters, even when hearing as little as 1 s of speech (Grossman, 2015; Sasson et al., 2017). These negative first impressions may have long term effects, for example, providing a less optimal scaffolding for socio‐communicative development, or even increasing the risks of social withdrawal and anxiety (Fay & Schuler, 1980; Fusaroli et al., 2019, 2021; Paul et al., 2005; Shriberg et al., 2001; Van Bourgondien & Woods, 1992; Warlaumont et al., 2014). Given their potential role in affecting social functioning and in assisting diagnostic and assessment http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Autism Research Wiley

Toward a cumulative science of vocal markers of autism: A cross‐linguistic meta‐analysis‐based investigation of acoustic markers in American and Danish autistic children

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals LLC.
ISSN
1939-3792
eISSN
1939-3806
DOI
10.1002/aur.2661
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONAtypical prosody and voice are commonly reported aspects of the speech of people with autism, which has been characterized as flat, sing‐songy, pedantic, hollow, inappropriate, hoarse, or hyper‐nasal (Asperger, 1991; Baltaxe & Simmons, 1975; Goldfarb et al., 1956; Kanner, 1943; Pronovost et al., 1966). Indeed, distinctive prosody is part of the diagnostic criteria in the ICD‐10 and in the ADOS‐2 assessment for autism (Lord et al., 2009; World Health Organization, 1992) and is indicated as one of the earliest‐appearing markers of a possible autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis (Oller et al., 2010). These vocal factors may play a role in the socio‐communicative impairments associated with the disorder. In addition to potentially impeding effective communication of, for example, emotional content (Travis & Sigman, 1998), they also generate negative responses from neurotypical (NT) raters, even when hearing as little as 1 s of speech (Grossman, 2015; Sasson et al., 2017). These negative first impressions may have long term effects, for example, providing a less optimal scaffolding for socio‐communicative development, or even increasing the risks of social withdrawal and anxiety (Fay & Schuler, 1980; Fusaroli et al., 2019, 2021; Paul et al., 2005; Shriberg et al., 2001; Van Bourgondien & Woods, 1992; Warlaumont et al., 2014). Given their potential role in affecting social functioning and in assisting diagnostic and assessment

Journal

Autism ResearchWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2022

Keywords: autism spectrum disorder; cross‐linguistic; speech; voice

References