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Time‐Lapse Cameras for Measurement of Grain Corn Phenology on the Canadian Prairies

Time‐Lapse Cameras for Measurement of Grain Corn Phenology on the Canadian Prairies AbbreviationsAAFCAgriculture and Agri‐Food CanadaBBCHBayer, BASF, Ciba‐Geigy, and HoechstBFnbeta functionCHUcorn heat unitCVcoefficient of variationDAPdays after plantingGDDgrowing degree dayGDD10standard growing degree dayGTIgeneral thermal indexmGDD10,30modified growing degree dayRMrelative maturityGrain corn (Zea mays L.) production in Western Canada occurs mainly in Manitoba. The provincial seeded area increased to more than 165,000 ha in 2016 and production jumped dramatically by 58% from 2010 to 2016 (Statistics Canada, 2017). The rapid increases in yield potential have sparked interest from prairie producers who want to grow the crop outside the traditional grain corn production area; however, this carries considerable risk. The challenge with grain corn production is the short growing season on the Canadian Prairie with its cool temperatures (Bullock et al., 2010). Delayed planting increases the risk of exposure to lethal cold temperatures late in the growing season prior to maturity (Nielsen et al., 2002); therefore, prairie farmers must select corn hybrids carefully to minimize this risk.The rate of phenological development of grain corn (i.e., the timing of occurrence of various growth stages) reflects its response to changes in the environment and varies with the genetic traits of different hybrids (Bannayan and Hoogenboom, 2009; Slafer et al., 2015). The major environmental factor affecting phenological development http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Time‐Lapse Cameras for Measurement of Grain Corn Phenology on the Canadian Prairies

12 pages

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2019.06.0046
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsAAFCAgriculture and Agri‐Food CanadaBBCHBayer, BASF, Ciba‐Geigy, and HoechstBFnbeta functionCHUcorn heat unitCVcoefficient of variationDAPdays after plantingGDDgrowing degree dayGDD10standard growing degree dayGTIgeneral thermal indexmGDD10,30modified growing degree dayRMrelative maturityGrain corn (Zea mays L.) production in Western Canada occurs mainly in Manitoba. The provincial seeded area increased to more than 165,000 ha in 2016 and production jumped dramatically by 58% from 2010 to 2016 (Statistics Canada, 2017). The rapid increases in yield potential have sparked interest from prairie producers who want to grow the crop outside the traditional grain corn production area; however, this carries considerable risk. The challenge with grain corn production is the short growing season on the Canadian Prairie with its cool temperatures (Bullock et al., 2010). Delayed planting increases the risk of exposure to lethal cold temperatures late in the growing season prior to maturity (Nielsen et al., 2002); therefore, prairie farmers must select corn hybrids carefully to minimize this risk.The rate of phenological development of grain corn (i.e., the timing of occurrence of various growth stages) reflects its response to changes in the environment and varies with the genetic traits of different hybrids (Bannayan and Hoogenboom, 2009; Slafer et al., 2015). The major environmental factor affecting phenological development

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References