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The value of nutrition support in children with cancer

The value of nutrition support in children with cancer A positive stance towards nutrition support of the child with cancer assures potential for normal growth, development, and quality of life during extended oncologic treatment. Data from recent studies of children with cancer (advanced neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumor) demonstrate the importance of integrating nutrition staging, assessment, and support into treatment protocols. Patients with solid tumors and lymphomas who are malnourished at diagnosis have a poor outcome when compared to nourished counterparts. Enteral nutrition (intensive nutrition counseling and favorite, nutritious foods) is effective in low nutritional risk groups but ineffective in preventing or reversing protein‐energy malnutrition in high nutritional risk groups. For high‐risk groups, central parenteral nutrition is a relatively short‐term, but important, support measure which allows children to grow despite extended periods of intense oncologic treatment. The patient's nutritional course may affect bone marrow suppression and the ability to tolerate aggressive chemotherapeutic treatment. Although treatment tolerance may be improved with nutrition support, adequacy of primary oncologic treatment outweighs other supportive factors as a determinant of ultimate survival. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer Wiley

The value of nutrition support in children with cancer

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References (65)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0008-543X
eISSN
1097-0142
DOI
10.1002/1097-0142(19861015)58:8+<1904::AID-CNCR2820581419>3.0.CO;2-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A positive stance towards nutrition support of the child with cancer assures potential for normal growth, development, and quality of life during extended oncologic treatment. Data from recent studies of children with cancer (advanced neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumor) demonstrate the importance of integrating nutrition staging, assessment, and support into treatment protocols. Patients with solid tumors and lymphomas who are malnourished at diagnosis have a poor outcome when compared to nourished counterparts. Enteral nutrition (intensive nutrition counseling and favorite, nutritious foods) is effective in low nutritional risk groups but ineffective in preventing or reversing protein‐energy malnutrition in high nutritional risk groups. For high‐risk groups, central parenteral nutrition is a relatively short‐term, but important, support measure which allows children to grow despite extended periods of intense oncologic treatment. The patient's nutritional course may affect bone marrow suppression and the ability to tolerate aggressive chemotherapeutic treatment. Although treatment tolerance may be improved with nutrition support, adequacy of primary oncologic treatment outweighs other supportive factors as a determinant of ultimate survival.

Journal

CancerWiley

Published: Mar 15, 1987

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