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The Line of Fifths

The Line of Fifths Music Analysis, 19/iii (2000) 289 ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2000. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK DAVID TEMPERLEY this is done primarily from the context of the events, not their intonation. On instruments whose tuning can be spontaneously varied, different spellings of a pitch ± G“ versus A‘ ± may also be acoustically distinguished in systematic and significant ways; and it is natural to wonder if this might affect the spellings that were perceived. However, I will not explore this possibility here. A related issue is the historical development of tonality ± most notably, the evolution of temperament and tuning systems. It may seem odd to neglect this topic in view of the obvious light it sheds on the subject at hand. If ± as I claim ± spelling distinctions are inherent in much tonal music, and have been internalised even by modern listeners, then there can be little doubt that these distinctions were first motivated by matters of temperament: the fact that the uses of a pitch were constrained by its tuning. But this is (at the very least) another article. My concern is solely with tonal music as it is performed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

The Line of Fifths

Music Analysis , Volume 19 (3) – Oct 1, 2000

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00122
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Music Analysis, 19/iii (2000) 289 ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2000. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK DAVID TEMPERLEY this is done primarily from the context of the events, not their intonation. On instruments whose tuning can be spontaneously varied, different spellings of a pitch ± G“ versus A‘ ± may also be acoustically distinguished in systematic and significant ways; and it is natural to wonder if this might affect the spellings that were perceived. However, I will not explore this possibility here. A related issue is the historical development of tonality ± most notably, the evolution of temperament and tuning systems. It may seem odd to neglect this topic in view of the obvious light it sheds on the subject at hand. If ± as I claim ± spelling distinctions are inherent in much tonal music, and have been internalised even by modern listeners, then there can be little doubt that these distinctions were first motivated by matters of temperament: the fact that the uses of a pitch were constrained by its tuning. But this is (at the very least) another article. My concern is solely with tonal music as it is performed

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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