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The idea of ‘ C ountry’: Reframing post‐disaster recovery in I ndigenous T aiwan settings

The idea of ‘ C ountry’: Reframing post‐disaster recovery in I ndigenous T aiwan settings In Australian Aboriginal thinking, the idea of ‘Country’ comprises complex ideas about relationships and connection. It simultaneously encompasses territorial affiliation, a social identification and cosmological orientation. It draws attention to what might be glossed as people‐to‐environment, people‐to‐people and people‐to‐cosmos relations. These relations influence disaster responses, but are rarely mobilised explicitly in shaping formal recovery and reconstruction efforts. Colonial disruption of connections to Country imposed new practices and presences into contemporary Indigenous geographies and is often reinforced in disaster settings. This paper considers more recent disruptions arising from post‐disaster recovery in Taiwan, arguing that the idea of Country offers a powerful way of framing cultural and social dimensions of post‐disaster relief and recovery for government agencies, non‐government organisations and research alike. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asia Pacific Viewpoint Wiley

The idea of ‘ C ountry’: Reframing post‐disaster recovery in I ndigenous T aiwan settings

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Victoria University of Wellington and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd
ISSN
1360-7456
eISSN
1467-8373
DOI
10.1111/apv.12058
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In Australian Aboriginal thinking, the idea of ‘Country’ comprises complex ideas about relationships and connection. It simultaneously encompasses territorial affiliation, a social identification and cosmological orientation. It draws attention to what might be glossed as people‐to‐environment, people‐to‐people and people‐to‐cosmos relations. These relations influence disaster responses, but are rarely mobilised explicitly in shaping formal recovery and reconstruction efforts. Colonial disruption of connections to Country imposed new practices and presences into contemporary Indigenous geographies and is often reinforced in disaster settings. This paper considers more recent disruptions arising from post‐disaster recovery in Taiwan, arguing that the idea of Country offers a powerful way of framing cultural and social dimensions of post‐disaster relief and recovery for government agencies, non‐government organisations and research alike.

Journal

Asia Pacific ViewpointWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2014

References