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The home literacy environment mediates effects of socio‐economic status on infant vocabulary development

The home literacy environment mediates effects of socio‐economic status on infant vocabulary... INTRODUCTIONA fundamental priority of child language researchers is to develop a generalizable account of the conditions under which children's language abilities thrive. This requires us to sample across diverse contexts (Weber et al., 2017). However, an overwhelming proportion of research on basic language development comes from Western, monolingual children originating from North America and Western Europe (Kidd & Garcia, 2022). Furthermore, even within these contexts, studies on language development have not sampled from the underlying population in a representative fashion, but instead have sampled disproportionately from families belonging to mid/high socio‐economic strata (e.g., Dale & Goodman, 2005; Fenson et al., 2007; Floccia et al., 2018; Hamilton et al., 2000). As a result, multilingual children, children from lower socio‐economic strata, and children from non‐Western contexts are markedly under‐represented in the research record. Diversifying the available evidence to incorporate these populations is critical to a more representative narrative on early language development. In this study, we investigated factors that support early language development in a socio‐economically diverse, non‐Western, multilingual setting. In particular, we focused on an everyday routine—shared book reading—as a protective factor against effects of socio‐economic disparities on language acquisition.Two areas of focus in the current study, effects of bilingualism and socio‐economic status (SES) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Science Wiley

The home literacy environment mediates effects of socio‐economic status on infant vocabulary development

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN
1363-755X
eISSN
1467-7687
DOI
10.1111/desc.13349
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONA fundamental priority of child language researchers is to develop a generalizable account of the conditions under which children's language abilities thrive. This requires us to sample across diverse contexts (Weber et al., 2017). However, an overwhelming proportion of research on basic language development comes from Western, monolingual children originating from North America and Western Europe (Kidd & Garcia, 2022). Furthermore, even within these contexts, studies on language development have not sampled from the underlying population in a representative fashion, but instead have sampled disproportionately from families belonging to mid/high socio‐economic strata (e.g., Dale & Goodman, 2005; Fenson et al., 2007; Floccia et al., 2018; Hamilton et al., 2000). As a result, multilingual children, children from lower socio‐economic strata, and children from non‐Western contexts are markedly under‐represented in the research record. Diversifying the available evidence to incorporate these populations is critical to a more representative narrative on early language development. In this study, we investigated factors that support early language development in a socio‐economically diverse, non‐Western, multilingual setting. In particular, we focused on an everyday routine—shared book reading—as a protective factor against effects of socio‐economic disparities on language acquisition.Two areas of focus in the current study, effects of bilingualism and socio‐economic status (SES)

Journal

Developmental ScienceWiley

Published: Nov 19, 2022

Keywords: bilingualism; infant development; socio‐economic status

References