Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Endless Parade: Competing Narratives in Recent Birtwistle Studies

The Endless Parade: Competing Narratives in Recent Birtwistle Studies RECENT In preparation for an introductory talk on his music given in the late 1960s,1 Harrison Birtwistle, feeling that his spoken observations might fail where his music should enlighten, began with the following lines: As I prepare to address you here, in the presence of my work which should really speak for itself, I cannot help wondering a little whether I have sufficient grounds for saying anything and whether I shall be able to do it right. For while as a composer I feel quite in command of the means to move others in the direction in which I myself am driven, I feel that it is not within my powers to map such paths so surely through word. Still, I comfort myself with the thought that my words will not stand alone; their aim is merely to [complement]. These remarks, derived from the opening of a lecture delivered at the Jena Kunstverein by the painter Paul Klee in 1924,2 offer a reminder of the fact that, unlike either of his close contemporaries Peter Maxwell Davies and Alexander Goehr (not to mention the majority of representatives from the post-war avant-garde), Birtwistle has largely resisted the temptation to lay http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

The Endless Parade: Competing Narratives in Recent Birtwistle Studies

Music Analysis , Volume 23 (1) – Mar 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-endless-parade-competing-narratives-in-recent-birtwistle-studies-Jw2Ap13urW
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/j.0262-5245.2004.00196.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RECENT In preparation for an introductory talk on his music given in the late 1960s,1 Harrison Birtwistle, feeling that his spoken observations might fail where his music should enlighten, began with the following lines: As I prepare to address you here, in the presence of my work which should really speak for itself, I cannot help wondering a little whether I have sufficient grounds for saying anything and whether I shall be able to do it right. For while as a composer I feel quite in command of the means to move others in the direction in which I myself am driven, I feel that it is not within my powers to map such paths so surely through word. Still, I comfort myself with the thought that my words will not stand alone; their aim is merely to [complement]. These remarks, derived from the opening of a lecture delivered at the Jena Kunstverein by the painter Paul Klee in 1924,2 offer a reminder of the fact that, unlike either of his close contemporaries Peter Maxwell Davies and Alexander Goehr (not to mention the majority of representatives from the post-war avant-garde), Birtwistle has largely resisted the temptation to lay

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.