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The basis for semi‐continuous composite construction

The basis for semi‐continuous composite construction Basic assumptions for the analysis and design of steel frames include modelling the beam to column connections as either pinned or rigid. Neither accord with reality in the sense that all practical forms of steelwork beam to column connection possess some degree of rotational stiffness and have some ability to transmit moments. For bare steelwork, there will be arrangements for which both properties are negligibly small – leading to the very reasonable assumption of “simple construction” – or some for which almost complete rigidity coupled with moment capacities equal to that of the connected members are generated – leading to treatment as “continuous construction”. Both approaches are, of course, simplifications, leading to convenient design procedures and associated calculations. When considering composite frames both assumptions become less satisfactory. Whilst “simple construction” leads to the minimum of calculations and a design approach that essentially works at the level of individual elements, it neglects several potentially beneficial features and actually requires adaptation of the resulting design to recognise the impossibility of actually providing pinned joints. Continuous construction is clearly irrational if conducted on an elastic basis due to the imbalance of the hogging and sagging moment capacities for composite sections, whilst moving to a plastic approach introduces severe limitations on the acceptable structural arrangements. All this leads naturally to an approach [1] that recognises the true characteristics of the joints and treats them as semi‐rigid and partial strength (semi‐continuous construction) – or in North American parlance “partially restrained (PR) construction”. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Steel Construction: Design and Research Wiley

The basis for semi‐continuous composite construction

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 2008 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
1867-0520
eISSN
1867-0539
DOI
10.1002/stco.200890002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Basic assumptions for the analysis and design of steel frames include modelling the beam to column connections as either pinned or rigid. Neither accord with reality in the sense that all practical forms of steelwork beam to column connection possess some degree of rotational stiffness and have some ability to transmit moments. For bare steelwork, there will be arrangements for which both properties are negligibly small – leading to the very reasonable assumption of “simple construction” – or some for which almost complete rigidity coupled with moment capacities equal to that of the connected members are generated – leading to treatment as “continuous construction”. Both approaches are, of course, simplifications, leading to convenient design procedures and associated calculations. When considering composite frames both assumptions become less satisfactory. Whilst “simple construction” leads to the minimum of calculations and a design approach that essentially works at the level of individual elements, it neglects several potentially beneficial features and actually requires adaptation of the resulting design to recognise the impossibility of actually providing pinned joints. Continuous construction is clearly irrational if conducted on an elastic basis due to the imbalance of the hogging and sagging moment capacities for composite sections, whilst moving to a plastic approach introduces severe limitations on the acceptable structural arrangements. All this leads naturally to an approach [1] that recognises the true characteristics of the joints and treats them as semi‐rigid and partial strength (semi‐continuous construction) – or in North American parlance “partially restrained (PR) construction”.

Journal

Steel Construction: Design and ResearchWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2008

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References