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The Ambulatory Medical Assistance (AMA) programme during active‐phase treatment in patients with haematological malignancies: A cost‐effectiveness analysis

The Ambulatory Medical Assistance (AMA) programme during active‐phase treatment in patients with... INTRODUCTIONHaematological malignancies (HM) encompass a variety of disease such as lymphoma, lymphoma B, multiple myeloma, Hodgkin's lymphoma (LH), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and other forms of lymphoma. They represent 13 new cases per 100,000 habitants worldwide (Defossez et al., 2019). About two‐thirds of HM are lymphomas (LH and non‐HL).HM, and specifically aggressive lymphomas, are mostly treated with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. While chemotherapy is associated with improvement in overall survival, it can induce life‐threatening adverse events (AEs) (Habermann et al., 2006; Pfreundschuh et al., 2008). Severe neutropenia is the most critical treatment‐related AE. Frequent but less severe AEs also include constipation, nausea, vomiting, mucositis and neuropathy (15% in the GELA study) (Coiffier et al., 2002).The AEs reduce quality of life and sometimes lead to delays in chemotherapy schedules or even treatment discontinuation. This results in decreases in relative dose intensity (RDI) associated with a reduction in treatment efficacy and of HM survival (Hirakawa et al., 2010).The AEs generally appear during the days following treatment administration when patients are back home and thus are generally managed by phone calls where the patients call the oncology unit and less commonly the primary care provider. Unscheduled patient calls lack reliability and urgency and cause inappropriate use of healthcare http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

The Ambulatory Medical Assistance (AMA) programme during active‐phase treatment in patients with haematological malignancies: A cost‐effectiveness analysis

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13709
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONHaematological malignancies (HM) encompass a variety of disease such as lymphoma, lymphoma B, multiple myeloma, Hodgkin's lymphoma (LH), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and other forms of lymphoma. They represent 13 new cases per 100,000 habitants worldwide (Defossez et al., 2019). About two‐thirds of HM are lymphomas (LH and non‐HL).HM, and specifically aggressive lymphomas, are mostly treated with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. While chemotherapy is associated with improvement in overall survival, it can induce life‐threatening adverse events (AEs) (Habermann et al., 2006; Pfreundschuh et al., 2008). Severe neutropenia is the most critical treatment‐related AE. Frequent but less severe AEs also include constipation, nausea, vomiting, mucositis and neuropathy (15% in the GELA study) (Coiffier et al., 2002).The AEs reduce quality of life and sometimes lead to delays in chemotherapy schedules or even treatment discontinuation. This results in decreases in relative dose intensity (RDI) associated with a reduction in treatment efficacy and of HM survival (Hirakawa et al., 2010).The AEs generally appear during the days following treatment administration when patients are back home and thus are generally managed by phone calls where the patients call the oncology unit and less commonly the primary care provider. Unscheduled patient calls lack reliability and urgency and cause inappropriate use of healthcare

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2022

Keywords: adverse events; chemotherapy; cost‐effectiveness; healthcare quality; monitoring; oncologic nursing

References