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Temperature‐Dependency of Phosphorus Sorption by Goethites and Tropical Soils Amended with Woodchip Biochar

Temperature‐Dependency of Phosphorus Sorption by Goethites and Tropical Soils Amended with... Abbreviationsα‐FeOOHgoethiteAICCAkaike Information Criterion (corrected)Al‐goethitealuminum‐substituted goethiteANOVAanalysis of varianceEDSenergy dispersive spectroscopyKfFreundlich constantKLLangmuir constantSmaxLangmuir sorption maximumXRDX‐ray diffractionPhosphorus is an essential macronutrient, and its deficiency can reduce plant growth and yield potential. Phosphorus is a limiting nutrient in most soils and is becoming increasingly scarce and expensive (Cordell et al., 2009). Management of P to improve its availability for plant uptake while minimizing adverse environmental impacts via offsite transport to surface water bodies is critical (Cordell et al., 2011). Phosphorus sorption is a major process governing P availability for plant uptake and in most weathered soils around the world is attributed to oxides of Fe and Al (Pierzynski and McDowell, 2005). Goethite is a common Fe oxide in most soils, but Al can substitute for up to one‐third of its Fe content (Carlson, 1995). This is because Al is ubiquitous and abundant in soils and rocks, from which it is mobilized, together with Fe, during weathering (Cornell and Schwertmann, 2003).The high content of iron oxides in highly weathered soils, particularly those in tropical areas, can have an adverse effect on P availability in agricultural soils because of the high sorption capacity of the soils. For example, P sorption capacities of up to 1197 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Temperature‐Dependency of Phosphorus Sorption by Goethites and Tropical Soils Amended with Woodchip Biochar

6 pages

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2018.12.0067
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abbreviationsα‐FeOOHgoethiteAICCAkaike Information Criterion (corrected)Al‐goethitealuminum‐substituted goethiteANOVAanalysis of varianceEDSenergy dispersive spectroscopyKfFreundlich constantKLLangmuir constantSmaxLangmuir sorption maximumXRDX‐ray diffractionPhosphorus is an essential macronutrient, and its deficiency can reduce plant growth and yield potential. Phosphorus is a limiting nutrient in most soils and is becoming increasingly scarce and expensive (Cordell et al., 2009). Management of P to improve its availability for plant uptake while minimizing adverse environmental impacts via offsite transport to surface water bodies is critical (Cordell et al., 2011). Phosphorus sorption is a major process governing P availability for plant uptake and in most weathered soils around the world is attributed to oxides of Fe and Al (Pierzynski and McDowell, 2005). Goethite is a common Fe oxide in most soils, but Al can substitute for up to one‐third of its Fe content (Carlson, 1995). This is because Al is ubiquitous and abundant in soils and rocks, from which it is mobilized, together with Fe, during weathering (Cornell and Schwertmann, 2003).The high content of iron oxides in highly weathered soils, particularly those in tropical areas, can have an adverse effect on P availability in agricultural soils because of the high sorption capacity of the soils. For example, P sorption capacities of up to 1197

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References