Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Teaching Mr Pip . Mr Pip . Directed by Andrew Adamson ( 2012 ) Produced by Strange Weather Films. Distributor: Paramount Pictures. Funded by the New Zealand Film Commission. Dur: 133 minutes.

Teaching Mr Pip . Mr Pip . Directed by Andrew Adamson ( 2012 ) Produced by Strange Weather Films.... Works of fiction (literature, film) have been used in different contexts by social scientists for decades. They can be objects of study, sources of data, methodological tools, modes of representation and teaching material. Feature films set in the Asia Pacific region frequently explore issues addressed by researchers, including war and conflict, colonialism, climate change and natural resource exploitation. Recently, Mr Pip has drawn public interest as a film set in Oceania that portrays an event – the Bougainville conflict – that has not otherwise received much attention from the commercial film industry. Mr Pip is a popular choice of movie for fund‐raising events in New Zealand and Australia, with members of the public often turning to social scientists for further commentary. While fictional, Mr Pip provides us with an opportunity to engage in public conversations about the issues it raises. In this review, I discuss academic debates the film invites us to consider, and evaluate its usefulness as a teaching resource. Director Andrew Adamson adapted Mr Pip from Lloyd Jones' award‐winning 2006 novel. Mr Pip tells the story of Matilda (Xzannjah Matsi), a 13‐year‐old girl living in a small village near the Panguna copper mine in the early http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asia Pacific Viewpoint Wiley

Teaching Mr Pip . Mr Pip . Directed by Andrew Adamson ( 2012 ) Produced by Strange Weather Films. Distributor: Paramount Pictures. Funded by the New Zealand Film Commission. Dur: 133 minutes.

Asia Pacific Viewpoint , Volume 55 (3) – Dec 1, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/teaching-mr-pip-mr-pip-directed-by-andrew-adamson-2012-produced-by-YJ7bIzA1BZ
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Victoria University of Wellington and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd
ISSN
1360-7456
eISSN
1467-8373
DOI
10.1111/apv.12076
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Works of fiction (literature, film) have been used in different contexts by social scientists for decades. They can be objects of study, sources of data, methodological tools, modes of representation and teaching material. Feature films set in the Asia Pacific region frequently explore issues addressed by researchers, including war and conflict, colonialism, climate change and natural resource exploitation. Recently, Mr Pip has drawn public interest as a film set in Oceania that portrays an event – the Bougainville conflict – that has not otherwise received much attention from the commercial film industry. Mr Pip is a popular choice of movie for fund‐raising events in New Zealand and Australia, with members of the public often turning to social scientists for further commentary. While fictional, Mr Pip provides us with an opportunity to engage in public conversations about the issues it raises. In this review, I discuss academic debates the film invites us to consider, and evaluate its usefulness as a teaching resource. Director Andrew Adamson adapted Mr Pip from Lloyd Jones' award‐winning 2006 novel. Mr Pip tells the story of Matilda (Xzannjah Matsi), a 13‐year‐old girl living in a small village near the Panguna copper mine in the early

Journal

Asia Pacific ViewpointWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2014

References