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T he U nwritable in F ull P ursuit of the U nreadable : A dorno ' s P hilosophie der neuen M usik in T ranslation

T he U nwritable in F ull P ursuit of the U nreadable : A dorno ' s P hilosophie der neuen M usik... Dedicated to Victor Wildman sine quo non I The summer of 1948, when I returned to Germany for the first time since 1933, gave me a clear test of the amount of adaptation I have undergone. The change has been first of all a change in my mode of expression. The English language has worked on me what my German friends and former students considered a miracle: it has made me understandable. ( Tillich 1949 , p. 732) English scientific writing requires a degree of clarity and definiteness that German writing does not. A type of expression that in English would be scorned as muddle‐headed and confused is quite acceptable in German. While English authors, particularly in scientific writings, shun ambiguities, German writing is full of them. ( Bettelheim 1984 , p. 44) Professors of Greek forget or are unaware that Thomas Aquinas, who did not know Greek, was a better interpreter of Aristotle than any of them have proved to be, not only because he was smarter but because he took Aristotle more seriously. ( Bloom 1987 , p. 376) [It has been said] that translation is both a permanent necessity and a radically impossible undertaking. ( http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

T he U nwritable in F ull P ursuit of the U nreadable : A dorno ' s P hilosophie der neuen M usik in T ranslation

Music Analysis , Volume 30 (1) – Mar 1, 2011

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2012 The Author. Music Analysis © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/j.1468-2249.2011.00335.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dedicated to Victor Wildman sine quo non I The summer of 1948, when I returned to Germany for the first time since 1933, gave me a clear test of the amount of adaptation I have undergone. The change has been first of all a change in my mode of expression. The English language has worked on me what my German friends and former students considered a miracle: it has made me understandable. ( Tillich 1949 , p. 732) English scientific writing requires a degree of clarity and definiteness that German writing does not. A type of expression that in English would be scorned as muddle‐headed and confused is quite acceptable in German. While English authors, particularly in scientific writings, shun ambiguities, German writing is full of them. ( Bettelheim 1984 , p. 44) Professors of Greek forget or are unaware that Thomas Aquinas, who did not know Greek, was a better interpreter of Aristotle than any of them have proved to be, not only because he was smarter but because he took Aristotle more seriously. ( Bloom 1987 , p. 376) [It has been said] that translation is both a permanent necessity and a radically impossible undertaking. (

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2011

References