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Spatial Soil Nutrient–Plant–Herbivore Linkages: A Case Study from Two Poultry Litter–Amended Pastures in Northwest Arkansas

Spatial Soil Nutrient–Plant–Herbivore Linkages: A Case Study from Two Poultry Litter–Amended... AbbreviationsATVall‐terrain vehicleBMPsbest management practicesDRPdissolved reactive phosphorusOMorganic matterSTPsoil test phosphorusSpatial interactions with soil P saturation and loading from poultry litter applications, as well as with plant composition under grazing, remains enigmatic. Poultry litter is commonly surface‐applied on perennial pastures as a low‐cost fertilizer to support forage growth in cow–calf operations. Surface application exposes litter to nutrient runoff, which is difficult to predict due to spatially variable landscape attributes affecting infiltration and drainage (Kleinman et al., 2007; Dari et al., 2017). In addition, long‐term applications can result in excessive P buildup relative to potential plant uptake, which in turn leads to losses and reduced surface water quality (King et al., 2015; Sharpley, 2016). Geostatistical models that predict potential “hot spots” within a farm or field generally ignore plant–herbivore system interactions. Therefore, investigations are needed that correlate soil properties and forage species composition with P fractions.Effective best management practices (BMPs) meet specific individual farm conditions and can be costly and labor intensive for large areas needing P management. Estimations of P loss must be made for an effective management practice to be developed. Phosphorus indices and P storage capacity estimates have been developed and may predict potential P losses (soils acting as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Spatial Soil Nutrient–Plant–Herbivore Linkages: A Case Study from Two Poultry Litter–Amended Pastures in Northwest Arkansas

7 pages

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2018.09.0039
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsATVall‐terrain vehicleBMPsbest management practicesDRPdissolved reactive phosphorusOMorganic matterSTPsoil test phosphorusSpatial interactions with soil P saturation and loading from poultry litter applications, as well as with plant composition under grazing, remains enigmatic. Poultry litter is commonly surface‐applied on perennial pastures as a low‐cost fertilizer to support forage growth in cow–calf operations. Surface application exposes litter to nutrient runoff, which is difficult to predict due to spatially variable landscape attributes affecting infiltration and drainage (Kleinman et al., 2007; Dari et al., 2017). In addition, long‐term applications can result in excessive P buildup relative to potential plant uptake, which in turn leads to losses and reduced surface water quality (King et al., 2015; Sharpley, 2016). Geostatistical models that predict potential “hot spots” within a farm or field generally ignore plant–herbivore system interactions. Therefore, investigations are needed that correlate soil properties and forage species composition with P fractions.Effective best management practices (BMPs) meet specific individual farm conditions and can be costly and labor intensive for large areas needing P management. Estimations of P loss must be made for an effective management practice to be developed. Phosphorus indices and P storage capacity estimates have been developed and may predict potential P losses (soils acting as

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References