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Schenker, Cube and Schubert's ‘Der Doppelgänger’

Schenker, Cube and Schubert's ‘Der Doppelgänger’ ABSTRACT Schubert's ‘Der Doppelgänger’ is among the composer's most‐analysed works. Yet, in spite of numerous published Schenkerian readings, Schenker's own analytical sketches of the song remain largely neglected. His work on ‘Der Doppelgänger’ was prompted by a letter from Felix‐Eberhard von Cube of 8 May 1932, which enclosed a voice‐leading analysis. Although this analysis does not survive, the broad outline of Cube's reading can be reconstructed from the letter. Schenker's reply to Cube is not known to survive, but a diary entry of 17 July 1932 records work on the song and the sending of a ‘solution’ to his former pupil; sketches in the Oster Collection, also dating from 17 July 1932, further document the theorist's work on the song that day. Schenker appears to settle on an Urlinie that descends from 3̂, in contrast to the primary tone of 5̂ that features not only in Cube's original analysis but also in many recently published ones. In choosing a 3̂‐line, Schenker places great weight on the relationship between the song's Urlinie and its four‐note ostinato motive, and the sketches illustrate how his concerns are similar to those of modern‐day theorists working three‐quarters of a century later. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Schenker, Cube and Schubert's ‘Der Doppelgänger’

Music Analysis , Volume 34 (2) – Jul 1, 2015

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12048
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Schubert's ‘Der Doppelgänger’ is among the composer's most‐analysed works. Yet, in spite of numerous published Schenkerian readings, Schenker's own analytical sketches of the song remain largely neglected. His work on ‘Der Doppelgänger’ was prompted by a letter from Felix‐Eberhard von Cube of 8 May 1932, which enclosed a voice‐leading analysis. Although this analysis does not survive, the broad outline of Cube's reading can be reconstructed from the letter. Schenker's reply to Cube is not known to survive, but a diary entry of 17 July 1932 records work on the song and the sending of a ‘solution’ to his former pupil; sketches in the Oster Collection, also dating from 17 July 1932, further document the theorist's work on the song that day. Schenker appears to settle on an Urlinie that descends from 3̂, in contrast to the primary tone of 5̂ that features not only in Cube's original analysis but also in many recently published ones. In choosing a 3̂‐line, Schenker places great weight on the relationship between the song's Urlinie and its four‐note ostinato motive, and the sketches illustrate how his concerns are similar to those of modern‐day theorists working three‐quarters of a century later.

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2015

References