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Schenker and Bach's French Suite in E major

Schenker and Bach's French Suite in E major ABSTRACT The Oster Collection in the New York Public Library has some 43 documents, comprising 83 written pages of fragmentary jottings, analytical sketches and full‐scale layered voice‐leading graphs, relating to J. S. Bach's French Suite No. 6 in E major – all of which are tabulated and briefly described here. Schenker's analytical work on the middleground structures of its eight movements, in which descending linear progressions and the technique of reaching‐over are prominent, are traced here. This work shows that the theorist was for a long time undecided about the primary tone of the Sarabande. Although none of these documents is dated, Schenker's diary and lesson‐book for 1927–8 suggest that at least some of them relate to this teaching year. Moreover, because in May 1927 Schenker had resumed work, after several years’ stagnation, on Free Composition, and because some of the materials for the Suite were filed in folders that contained materials for this work, there is a presumptive connection between this analytical activity and his final theoretical work, whose supplementary volume includes no fewer than thirteen examples from the Suite. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Schenker and Bach's French Suite in E major

Music Analysis , Volume 34 (2) – Jul 1, 2015

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12051
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT The Oster Collection in the New York Public Library has some 43 documents, comprising 83 written pages of fragmentary jottings, analytical sketches and full‐scale layered voice‐leading graphs, relating to J. S. Bach's French Suite No. 6 in E major – all of which are tabulated and briefly described here. Schenker's analytical work on the middleground structures of its eight movements, in which descending linear progressions and the technique of reaching‐over are prominent, are traced here. This work shows that the theorist was for a long time undecided about the primary tone of the Sarabande. Although none of these documents is dated, Schenker's diary and lesson‐book for 1927–8 suggest that at least some of them relate to this teaching year. Moreover, because in May 1927 Schenker had resumed work, after several years’ stagnation, on Free Composition, and because some of the materials for the Suite were filed in folders that contained materials for this work, there is a presumptive connection between this analytical activity and his final theoretical work, whose supplementary volume includes no fewer than thirteen examples from the Suite.

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2015

References